Books

Raleigh mom’s book finds humor in summer with the kids

When Dr. Frederick Douglas Burroughs opened his practice in Southeast Raleigh in the 1960s, he was the city’s first African-American physician to devote his practice solely to pediatrics. In his autobiography, “Sharing My Journey to a Career in Medicine in a Transitioning South,” Burroughs reminds readers that anything is possible, despite the challenges along the path.
When Dr. Frederick Douglas Burroughs opened his practice in Southeast Raleigh in the 1960s, he was the city’s first African-American physician to devote his practice solely to pediatrics. In his autobiography, “Sharing My Journey to a Career in Medicine in a Transitioning South,” Burroughs reminds readers that anything is possible, despite the challenges along the path. Doug’s Memoirs

Humor writer Lori Shandle-Fox knows something about navigating the seasons with children: She has almost 11-year-old triplets. Her newest ebook, “Laughing IS Conceivable; From End of School to Back-to-School” (Amazon), is for parents who can relate during this “fourth season” of the year.

“Only parents of school-aged kids have this fourth season: that short span of time between when one school year ends and the next begins,” she says. “Camp versus keeping them home all day every day – every single, solitary day – bouncy houses at local festivals where 14-year-olds try to pummel 5-year-olds into baking powder, bored children, pools, bowling … did I mention bored children?” Then, suddenly, parents are shoved into back-to-school mode. “Yep, you’ve been whiplashed right back into another school year.”

Shandle-Fox, who lives in Raleigh, says she blogs and writes “using humor to de-stress people from many of life’s anxiety-producing moments, all ones I’ve experienced firsthand.”

New title

When Dr. Frederick Douglas Burroughs opened his practice in Southeast Raleigh in the 1960s, he was the city’s first African-American physician to devote his practice solely to pediatrics. He broke other racial barriers during his 41-year career: He was the first African-American doctor to serve on the staff at Rex Hospital and recruited other African-American physicians to the area. In his autobiography, “Sharing My Journey to a Career in Medicine in a Transitioning South” (Doug’s Memoirs), Burroughs reminds readers that anything is possible, despite the challenges along the path. He continues to mentor many of his former patients and students and this year received the Distinguished Service Award from the UNC School of Medicine.

For children

Donna Provance wrote “Meet Odie” (Crimson Gold Publishing) to answer questions Odie’s young friends were asking. Odie, a real dog who lives in Apex, tells what it was like to be adopted from an animal shelter and gives the true scoop about dogs.

“I added a children-centric glossary and what I call Paw Smart facts,” Provance said. She came up with the idea for the book after a child moved from the neighborhood. “For the first few days after she moved away, Odie would wait for her at the end of the driveway,” she says. “It was during one of those waits that the book idea struck me.” 

Awards

Local writers William Finger and Drew Bridges each won a Next Generation Indie Book award from the Independent Book Publishing Professionals Group. Finger, who lives in Raleigh, won in the general memoir category for “The Crane Dance: Taking Flight in Midlife” (JourneyCake Spirit). Bridges won in the fiction category for “The Family in the Mirror” (iUniverse). He lives in Wake Forest. Finger and Bridges participated in the same writing group while completing their books.

Triangle-area authors: We want to hear about your new book. Send information to bookbeat@newsobserver.com. As space permits, we will mention self-published books by local authors that are for sale on commercial sites.

  Comments