Books

New anthologies feature NC writers

Clyde Edgerton is one of several authors with ties to the Triangle with pieces in “Best Creative Nonfiction of the South, Volume II: North Carolina” published by the Texas Review Press.
Clyde Edgerton is one of several authors with ties to the Triangle with pieces in “Best Creative Nonfiction of the South, Volume II: North Carolina” published by the Texas Review Press. Candice Cusic

With 13 full-length plays and various short works to her credit, author June Guralnick regularly draws critical acclaim.

Selections from her latest play, “Birds of a Feather: A Comedy about De-Extinction” are being published in two new anthologies, “The Best Men’s Stage Monologues” (Smith and Kraus) and “The Best Women’s Stage Monologues” (Smith and Kraus).

“Birds of a Feather” is a madcap romp about a time-traveling scientist who journeys a century into the past to New York City, circa 1912. His mission is to save the passenger pigeon.

“The play wrestles, in a screwball comedy kind of way (‘Bringing Up Baby’ meets ‘Doctor Who’) with the intersection of two unlikely bedfellows: the early conservation movement and suffragist struggle,” Guralnick says.

“Add to the mayhem social satire, slapstick humor, and an eccentric family of radical women and the result is a comedic love story that evokes laughter on women’s changing roles while provoking more serious reflection on the nature of progress and the world’s disappearing species.”

Guralnick, a playwright and director, lives in Apex. The anthologies will be released Jan. 20. They are available for pre-order on Amazon.

Anthology

Texas Review Press has released a new volume in its state by state series of anthologies. “Best Creative Nonfiction of the South, Volume II: North Carolina” contains essays that celebrate and document the Tar Heel state’s diverse cultures and geography, from mountains to sea. The writers include Clyde Edgerton, Jill McCorkle, Ron Rash and Allan Gurganus.

New titles

Raleigh author Wayne Grant recently debuted “A Prince of Wales” (CreateSpace), the fifth in “The Saga of Roland Inness” series. The books follow a peasant boy who rises to become a war leader under Richard the Lionheart. The historical fiction series for young adults began as a serial bedtime story for Grant’s two sons.

Raleigh attorney Bob Whitley shares real-life stories in his new book, “Attorney on Call: Lessons from a Life in the Law” (Expert Press). The book covers everything from the birth of Whitley’s firm to what to do if you’re involved in an accident. To request a free copy of the book, visit www.whitleylawfirm.com.

Bookwatch

Greensboro native Matthew Griffin will talk about his first novel, “Hide” (Bloomsbury USA) on UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch at 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 28. “Hide” is the story of two older gay men who have long lived together on the outskirts of a small North Carolina town. They have paid a heavy price for being gay, but the story’s power comes from the way in which they adapt to the challenges of aging. Earlier this year, Griffin won the Crook’s Corner Book Prize for best debut novel set in the American South.

Triangle-area authors: We want to hear about your new book. Send information to bookbeat@newsobserver.com. As space permits, we will mention self-published books by local authors that are for sale on commercial sites.

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