Books

This Raleigh nurse has written a guide for caregivers

Raleigh nurse Judith R. Sands has written “Home Hospice Navigation,” a handbook designed to help caregivers effectively manage the hospice journey, from the initial conversation to managing in-home care and saying goodbye.
Raleigh nurse Judith R. Sands has written “Home Hospice Navigation,” a handbook designed to help caregivers effectively manage the hospice journey, from the initial conversation to managing in-home care and saying goodbye. N&O file photo

“Home Hospice Navigation: The Caregiver’s Guide” (CreateSpace) is a culmination of author Judith R. Sands’ background as a health care professional and her time spent as a caregiver.

“The decision to write ‘Home Hospice Navigation’ was based on my experiences caring for my mother and my desire to make the home hospice journey understandable and less stressful for caregivers,” she says. “The book answers Mom’s question: ‘What do families do without someone with your knowledge and experience?’ 

“Home Hospice Navigation” is a handbook designed to help caregivers effectively manage the hospice journey, from the initial conversation about whether to begin hospice care, to managing in-home care and saying goodbye. Practical tips and resources are sprinkled throughout the book.

“End-of-life care is rife with cultural, social and faith-based connotations and expectations, personal biases and fears, Sands says. “Care-related challenges abound for the loved one, the family and significant others. Everyone has a set of expectations and often they are unclear or in conflict with those involved in the care process. Navigating through the unknowns before issues and concerns become problems is critical for successful caregiving.”

Sands is a registered nurse and certified in case, quality, and risk management. She lives in Raleigh.

New title

“A Colonial Williamsburg Love Affair: Tales, Takes, and Tips from a Lifetime of Visits” (Intropak Publications) is the culmination of Debra Bailey’s more than 50 years of visits to Colonial Williamsburg. “It’s not just a travel guide, it’s a story of soul – mine and Colonial Williamsburg’s,” Bailey says. The book includes insider tips and information for visitors of all ages. Bailey, a self-avowed history geek, lives in Durham.

Awards

Theresa Dowell Blackinton of Durham has won the 2018 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize for her story “Reunification.” Blackinton will receive $1,000 and possible publication in The Thomas Wolfe Review. The prize, awarded to a short story of 3,000 words or less, is administered by the Great Smokies Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Asheville.

Miriam Herin of Greensboro is the winner of the 2018 Doris Betts Fiction Prize competition for her story “Lucky.” She will receive a prize of $250 from the North Carolina Writers’ Network and her story will be published in the North Carolina Literary Review’s 2019 print issue.

For writers

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is accepting applications for the inaugural Sally Buckner Emerging Writers’ Fellowship. The annual $500 award will support an emerging writer, aged 21 to 35, whose work shows promise of excellence and of commitment to a literary career. Each year, the fellowship will go to a writer working primarily in a designated genre. The 2019 Buckner Fellowship will support an emerging poet. For information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Bookwatch

Author Charlie Lovett talks about his latest novel, “The Lost Book of the Grail,” (Penguin Books) on UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch at 11 a.m. on Sunday, May 27, and 5 p.m. Thursday, May 31. “The Lost Book of the Grail” connects readers to King Author, the Holy Grail and more than 1,000 years of British church history. Lovett lives in Winston-Salem.

Triangle-area authors: We want to hear about your new book. Send information to bookbeat@newsobserver.com. As space permits, we will mention self-published books by local authors that are for sale on commercial sites.

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