Mouthful

Raleigh chef, restaurants featured in Southern Living’s 50th anniversary issue

Raleigh chef and restauranteur Ashley Christensen in a 2011 portrait at Poole's Downtown Diner in Raleigh. Christensen’s Death & Taxes is this year’s Restaurant of the Year.
Raleigh chef and restauranteur Ashley Christensen in a 2011 portrait at Poole's Downtown Diner in Raleigh. Christensen’s Death & Taxes is this year’s Restaurant of the Year. tlong@newsobserver.com

A couple Triangle places and a Raleigh chef are mentioned in Southern Living’s 50th anniversary issue:

▪ Raleigh chef Ashley Christensen is among the women profiled in the story “Five Southern Kitchen Magicians.” About Christensen, the story said, “Her father, a truck driver, would drape freshly made strands of pasta over chair backs and broom handles, and her parents cooked dinner nearly every night. In college, she often threw dinner parties, and fell in love with hosting people. That background drives this beloved chef to nurture her business—and her diners—with a deep sense of hospitality. Not yet 40, Christensen oversees 250 employees, from Poole's Diner, where people pack into banquettes for the richest, gooiest mac and cheese in the land, to Death & Taxes—her first real foray into fine dining—with its flame-licked oysters, whole roasted fish, and 93-day aged beef. And we get the sense she's just hitting her stride.”

▪ In the story, “50 Best Places in the South Now,” two Raleigh spots got mentioned: Standard Foods and Raleigh Beer Garden.

About the former, it said: “Raleigh recently welcomed chef Scott Crawford’s new Standard Foods, a restaurant and grocery that celebrates both traditional farmers and artisanal producers with its farm-to-table menu and an assortment of retail products.”

About the beer garden, it said, “What’s the brew-haha? The brand-new, 500-square-foot Raleigh Beer Garden has opened in the capital city with a whopping 366 options on tap, including 144 North Carolina brews. The popular watering hole joins a thriving beer scene that includes the 21-stop Raleigh Beer Trail; Beltline Brew Tours, three-to four-hour visits to several breweries in Raleigh and Durham; and even a pedal-powered Trolley Pub, which conducts lively sipping tours through Raleigh.”

Of course, North Carolina was not overlooked in the magazine’s story, “The South’s Legendary Barbecue Joints.” Hill’s Lexington Barbecue in Winston-Salem and Bum’s Restaurant in Ayden were both included.

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Twitter: @andreaweigl

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