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This museum houses the ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ plane. Now it needs to find a new home

Flight 1549 passengers talk about crash landing

With the new movie "Sully" appearing in theaters interest in the flight that had to crash land in the Hudson River is again peaking. Flight 1549 passengers talked to visitors at the Carolinas Aviation Museum.
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With the new movie "Sully" appearing in theaters interest in the flight that had to crash land in the Hudson River is again peaking. Flight 1549 passengers talked to visitors at the Carolinas Aviation Museum.

The Carolinas Aviation Museum, which houses the “Miracle on the Hudson” plane at Charlotte Douglas International Airport, is seeking a new home.

Airport, city and museum officials said the current location, a 40,000-square-foot hanger at the end of one of the airport’s runways, will be re-purposed for private aviation needs to meet FAA requirements.

The museum will close part of its operations temporarily this summer. Carolinas Aviation Museum President Stephen Saucier said the museum board and staff are working on what the suspension of some operations will mean for the museum’s 15 employees and volunteers

On Tuesday, the museum will celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the Miracle on the Hudson. US Airways Flight 1549 was leaving LaGuardia Airport and headed for Charlotte when its engines failed after hitting a flock of geese. Pilot Chesley Sullenberger safely landed the plane in the Hudson River.

Warner Bros. unveiled the first trailer for its forthcoming drama, “Sully,” which stars Tom Hanks as Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, the "Miracle on the Hudson" pilot.



The museum will share its new plans soon, Saucier said.

Discussions have included a capital campaign to raise money for a new space, according to a news release.

“The museum’s staff is working with airport officials and aviation experts to safeguard and position elsewhere on airport property the aircrafts in its collection, including the famous ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ plane that has helped attract more than 70,000 visitors each year,” the news release stated.

Several sites are being considered for the museum, “ideally including airport ramp access to facilitate the transport of aircraft as part of the museum’s exhibits,” according to the news release.

Cassie Cope covers business in Charlotte, with a focus on Charlotte Douglas airport, Duke Energy, Atrium Health and Novant Health. She previously covered politics at The State in Columbia, S.C., and is a graduate of the University of South Carolina.

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