Health Care

The ‘most distinctive’ cause of death in each state, according to the CDC

This CDC map shows the most distinctive causes of death in each state, including tuberculosis, syphilis, the flu, accidental discharge of firearms and others.
This CDC map shows the most distinctive causes of death in each state, including tuberculosis, syphilis, the flu, accidental discharge of firearms and others.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has created a map with the most distinctive causes of death in each state, including tuberculosis, syphilis, the flu, accidental discharge of firearms and others.

North Carolina’s is “other nutritional deficiencies,” even though the state is one of the top producers of poultry and eggs, pork, strawberries, sweet potatoes, peanuts and other produce.

The CDC used data from 2001 to 2010 and calculated mortality rates for all 113 listed causes of death in each state, and compared that with the rates for the same causes of death nationwide. The distinctive cause of death identified in each state was at least double the corresponding national rate.

Tuberculosis was the top distinctive killer in Texas. In the coal-mining states of Kentucky and West Virginia, it was pneumoconiosis, or black lung disease.

For North Carolina’s neighbors to the north and south – Virginia and South Carolina – it was “other acute ischemic heart diseases.”

North Carolina was joined by Vermont and New Hampshire with “other nutritional deficiencies” as the most distinctive cause.

In Oregon, Nevada and New Mexico, it was “legal intervention,” which means a death in the context of a crime scene, for either someone in law enforcement or a civilian.

Accidental discharge of firearms, or discharge of firearms with an undetermined intent, were the most distinctive causes of death in Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama.

Florida was the only state with HIV as its most distinctive cause. Louisiana was the only state to put syphilis on the list.

In much of the Midwest the most distinctive cause of death was the flu, or other lower respiratory infections.

For more information, go to: www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2015/14_0395.htm.

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