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Did you buy one of these bags of fried pork skins? Don’t eat them, USDA warns.

This is the pork product the USDA wants  you to return or throw away. USDA photo
This is the pork product the USDA wants you to return or throw away. USDA photo

A North Carolina company specializing in vacuum-packed pork skins is recalling three of its most popular spicy products because of what the USDA termed a “high” health risk issue.

The products were shipped to a distributor and retailers in the Carolinas, federal officials said.

Two Brothers Pork Skins, based in Kannapolis, not only forgot to list many of the ingredients on its packages but left off how to cook the products, leading to the possibility of consumer confusion.

The company is recalling “an undetermined amount of pork skin products” due to “misbranding” of its products, according to a news release on Friday night by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. Also unknown: When the products were made, according to the USDA.

The company is recalling:

16-oz. plastic — semi-translucent — containers of “Two Brothers Dos Hermanos Cueritos Pork Skin in Brine.”

16-oz. clear, vacuum-sealed packages of “Two Brothers Dos Hermanos ChiCharron Prensado Fried Pork Skins.”

15-lbs. — 240-oz. — clear, vacuum-sealed packages of “Two Brothers Dos Hermanos CHiCharronh Prensado Fried Pork Skins.”

The Prensado products contained tomato puree, chorizo powder, vinegar, orange juice, garlic, black pepper, onion and spices, none of which were listed on the product labels, according to the USDA.

The recalled products list establishment number “EAST. 40259” in the USDA mark of inspection.

Inspectors with the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services spotted the labels that were missing ingredients and notified the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

No one has reported being sickened by the pork skins, according to the USDA release. Federal officials are concerned that some of the packages are in people’s refrigerators or freezers.

Don’t eat the pork skins, the USDA advised. Throw them away or return them to the retailer.

Kathleen Purvis takes us to two Charlotte restaurants, Sweet Lew's BBQ and Loft & Cellar, for a face-off between pork and chicken skins.

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