Durham News: Community

Arts briefs: DPAC architect to speak at library

The 2,700-seat Durham Performing Arts Center opened in 2008.
The 2,700-seat Durham Performing Arts Center opened in 2008. Travis Dove

DPAC architect to speak at library

Library to Durham County Library will host Durham Performing Arts Center’s chief architect Philip Szostak of Szostak Design for a talk on the building and the future of DPAC.

The talk will take place at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9, at the Main Library, 300. N. Roxboro St.

The Durham Performing Arts Center opened in November 2008 and changed the face of the city. From dance to Broadway, from concerts to comedy, the theater offers over 150 events each year. DPAC is currently listed among the Top 4 in Pollstar Magazine’s Top Worldwide Theater Venues.

Szostak is the head of Szostak Design, Inc., an architectural firm located in Chapel Hill. A graduate of the NC State University School of Design, Szostak has over 30 years of architectural experience, serving for 12 years as the NC principal architect for NBBJ, the nation’s second-largest architectural practice. Some of his company’s other local projects include the Duke University Medical Center and the Walltown Recreation Center.

Show celebrates black war heroes

Most Americans know the names of American Revolution heroes such as Patrick Henry, Betsy Ross and George Washington.

Some may even know the name Crispus Attucks, an African-American and the first casualty of the Revolution; he was shot and killed in what became known as the Boston Massacre.

But there were other, significant contributions of blacks to the American Revolution. It is estimated that over 5,000 African-Americans, both enslaved and free, served with the Continental Army and Navy and the local militia.

“In Hopes of Freedom,” 30 paintings by local artist Michelle Nichole currently on exhibit at the Hayti Heritage Center, captures the courage and determination of people of African descent who participated in the American Revolution.

“The heroes in my In Hopes of Freedom collection want to communicate,” says Nichole. “They want to inspire and empower you. They do not want to be relegated to the pages of a dusty old book, their stories long forgotten. I am pleased and honored to give them a voice and to share their legacy with you.”

“In Hopes of Freedom” will be on display during regular hours, through Sept. 30 at the Hayti Heritage Center, 804 Old Fayetteville St.

Classical concert premieres Sept. 22

Renowned conductor Gerard Schwarz and his hand-picked team of musicians come together to form a made-for-television classical music concert series premiering at 6 p.m. Sept. 22 on WUNC. (Check local listings or visit allstarorchestra.org for updates on broadcast dates and times.)

The All-Star Orchestra, similar to Major League Baseball’s All-Star team, is composed of the finest orchestral “athletes” from across the country. Naxos of America, the top independent classical music distributor in the U.S. and Canada, will release this unique series on DVD on Sept. 24.

Schwarz’s All-Star Orchestra is composed of musicians from leading orchestras based in Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Hartford, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Nashville, New York (the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra), Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Seattle, the Tampa Bay Area, Washington, D.C., and more.

Each of the eight one-hour episodes was filmed over four days in the Grand Ballroom at the Manhattan Center in New York City in August 2012. Designed to appeal to the classical music neophyte and connoisseur alike, the programs were filmed with 19 high-definition cameras that were allowed unlimited access to each performance, roaming freely among the musicians to provide the audience with the best visuals and behind-the-scene glances.

The Grand Ballroom, chosen for its acoustic integrity, has been the venue of choice for conductors such as Bernstein, Boulez, Mehta, and Toscanini for their own classical music recordings.

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