Eastern Wake News

Knightdale filmmaker hopes to make splash with ‘Wicked Series’

From left, cinematographer Trip Green shoots a scene with actors Ryan Helms and Derrell White for “The Wicked Series,” a TV series Knightdale writer and director Nick Dalmacy hopes will catch the eye of a Hollywood producer.
From left, cinematographer Trip Green shoots a scene with actors Ryan Helms and Derrell White for “The Wicked Series,” a TV series Knightdale writer and director Nick Dalmacy hopes will catch the eye of a Hollywood producer. COURTESY OF DALMACY FILMS

Nick Dalmacy grew up in New York, much better known for its film and TV industry than North Carolina, but it has been in his dozen years here that he has made strides as a producer, writer and director.

Now a Knightdale resident, Dalmacy has had an interest in film since his mother took him as a youngster to see “King Kong” in the 1970s.

He studied film theory at New York University and, being from Brooklyn, he remembers reaching out to a famous nearby filmmaker.

“I didn’t know much better, so I just called Spike Lee’s office,” Dalmacy said. “It was right in Brooklyn.”

He didn’t get through to the director, but he remembers the advice of the person who answered the phone.

“They just told me, ‘Shoot something. Write a script and shoot it and see what happens.’”

Even though he works a full-time job in sales for Time-Warner Cable to support his family, he has been able to accomplish that in recent years, releasing his full-length debut as a director and writer, “Scorn,” in 2011.

“Scorn” was filmed in Greenville and Ayden while Dalmacy lived in Farmville, south of Greenville.

Now relocated to Knightdale, he is working on a project he calls “The Wicked Series” that he imagines as a 10-part series. He is filming it in Knightdale and other locales in the Raleigh area.

He has released the first two episodes and the third is in post-production. Casting is underway for the fourth episode.

Raleigh’s Rialto Theatre, at 1620 Glenwood Ave., will have a showing of the first three episodes April 30. It will be the world premiere of the third episode.

Happy accident

The series concept happened by accident, Dalmacy said, when his director of photography from “Scorn” had some extra film taking up room in his refrigerator.

They had shot “Scorn” on videotape and Dalmacy was excited about the chance to use film, so he quickly wrote a 12-page script.

But he had in mind one of the actors from “Scorn,” Derrell White, who became unavailable, so he shelved the script for a couple years.

In that time, the script grew to 25 pages, enough for a 28-to-29-minute film, and when White became available again, Dalmacy was able to film the first installment, “Sins of the Wicked.”

The story is based on a police officer’s trip home to visit his ailing father. White, who has been a Raleigh police officer for 12 years, provided invaluable insight from his time on the force.

Originally Dalmacy intended it just as a complete project by itself, but then he started thinking about making a sequel. He thought of a way to add a phone call scene at the end of the first episode that would move the story forward toward a second part, “Sons of the Wicked.”

“That’s when I started thinking, ‘This could lead to something,’” Dalmacy said.

He has hopes of getting the series shown on a network.

“The goal is to get it in front of producers,” he said.

Learning on the job

Ayana Johnson, who is an actress, associate producer and casting director for the fourth episode, tentatively titled “Ways of the Wicked,” said there has been improvement in each installment as Dalmacy and his team continue to learn as they go.

“I believe in Nick,” she said. “I think it’s a great story. The cinematography is amazing.”

Each episode, Johnson said, leaves the viewer wanting to know what happens next.

“I think out of the first three, three is the best, and I’ve read four and it’s going to be better,” she said.

White, who not only plays one of the leading roles but is also a producer, said the loss of state filming incentives has led a lot of skilled people to leave for Atlanta recently, but that he and Dalmacy still have been able to build a talented team.

For many of the locations they shoot, they have reached out to people they know.

“We made it happen,” White said. “We’re going to try to do what we can here.”

Matt Goad: 919-829-4826

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