Garner Cleveland Record

Garner High SAVE students will present at national conference Saturday

The National Association of Students Against Violence Everywhere, a nonprofit dedicated to decreasing that statistic and the potential for violence in our schools and communities, is empowering students to create safer environments at its Summit March 12 in Raleigh.

Garner High School’s outstanding chapter will join youth from around the country at the SAVE Summit, a youth-led event that will train attendees in effective ways to reduce violence in their communities.

Garner Magnet High School SAVE members will lead an interactive workshop during the Summit on how their fellow students plan to do during their AntiBullying Week including their Rally ‘Round the Flag Pole on National SAVE Day. The group will show their peers how to use PSAs, class activities and school involvement explore the factors of bullying within schools and ways to take a stand and be the change.

Putting a stop to youth violence has never been more important. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports it as the third leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the U.S. Additionally, fatalities resulting from youth violence are only one part of the problem. Students face issues with bullying, dating violence, mental health, racism, social media safety, self-harm, teen safe driving, substance abuse and more. SAVE is determined to change this through engaging youth in crime prevention, conflict management and meaningful service activities. These key issues and more will be addressed at the annual Summit to empower students to take action in keeping their schools and communities safe.

“The National SAVE Summit provides a unique opportunity for student leaders to share successful safety and violence prevention tactics with their peers, allowing them to return to their chapters and implement new practical solutions,” said Carleen Wray, executive director of SAVE. “Through interactive activities, powerful presentations and nationally acclaimed speakers, the conference helps train attendees in effective ways to create an overall safer environment.”

This year’s Summit theme is “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a Single Step,” a quote from Lao Tzu. As with any change, creating safer environments for students everywhere must start somewhere. The nonprofit founders will share with attendees how and why they took the first step in SAVE’s journey of a thousand miles, as well as how impactful each members’ actions really are. Youth will also share their steps in the organization’s journey by leading motivating peer-to-peer sessions showcasing successful practices in violence prevention at the Summit, which is also attended by teachers, law enforcement, counselors and parents.

Since its inception in 1989, SAVE has grown from one school group to more than 2,100 chapters located in seven countries and 48 states. The organization mentors and provides resources, confidence and support to empower student leadership to help prevent school shootings, eliminate bullying and make their schools and communities safer for everyone. SAVE is also proud to join forces with The Allstate Foundation in educating youth in safety and violence prevention as well as teen safe driving.

For more information on the SAVE Summit, visit www.nationalsave.org/summit.

About the National Association of Students Against Violence Everywhere:

SAVE started at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, North Carolina in 1989 following the tragic death of a student who was trying to break up a fight at an off-campus party. Students met first to console each other, then as an organization to promote youth safety and to work together to prevent future incidents from occurring. SAVE provides education about the effects and consequences of violence and helps provide safe activities for students, parents and communities. For more information on SAVE or starting a SAVE chapter, visit www.nationalsave.org, or contact SAVE at (866) 343-SAVE to receive free startup materials and guidance.

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