North Raleigh News

First Friday: High Cotton features designs from NC State students

The early sketches and final design of Meredith West’s paisley design. West, a student in the NCSU College of Design, won last year’s High Cotton Collegiate Design Competition.
The early sketches and final design of Meredith West’s paisley design. West, a student in the NCSU College of Design, won last year’s High Cotton Collegiate Design Competition. jleonard@newsobserver.com

A paisley design created by a N.C. State University student will soon become part of the spring bow tie collection at High Cotton.

The downtown Raleigh men’s accessories store will present eight contest finalists from its third annual Collegiate Design Competition. The debut of the designs is part of High Cotton’s First Friday event this month.

Voters will have until December to pick their favorite student-created paisley design, said High Cotton founder and owner Judy Hill.

Paisley designs originated in England, taking cues from Persian and Indian art. One of the most notable shapes in paisley designs is one that resembles a twisted teardrop.

High Cotton began in 2009 in Charlotte.

“This competition started ... when High Cotton moved its flagship store to downtown Raleigh with the intention of drawing from the local talent at NCSU,” Hill said.

High Cotton picks a palate for the students to work with, and the budding designers submit a 6-inch-by-6-inch pattern for the competition.

Ross Andrews, a 22-year-old graphic design student, submitted a pattern last year but didn’t win. Since then, she has studied textiles in Italy and thinks she can make a better pattern this year.

Andrews, who wants to eventually make prints for home decor, said her paisley print is on a green background and “very busy.” She created it by drawing foliage and flowers and rotating the design.

Angele Gray, 21, studies print design at N.C. State and submitted her first paisley design this year. She incorporated cotton blooms into her design.

Although she’s used to creating designs, her paisley design was “more peppy” than her other work, Gray said.

Even if she doesn’t win, Andrews said she is looking forward to showing her work outside of the classroom.

“It makes me really excited because this is something I’m so passionate about,” she said.

Mechelle Hankerson: 919-829-4802, @mechelleh

Want to go?

First Friday, from 6 to 9 p.m., is a monthly art event in downtown Raleigh. Galleries stay open late, and many restaurants offer special deals. To learn more, go online to FirstFridayRaleigh.com.

More First Friday

Litmus Gallery, 312 W. Cabarrus St.: “Anything Goes 2015” exhibit with 40 local artists

Local Color Gallery, 22 Glenwood Ave.: “Fire, Form & Function,” works by sisters Mary Beth and Virginia Owen

The Mahler, 228 Fayetteville St.: “Click!” Triangle Photography Festival exhibit with Doug Van de Zande, Christer Berg, Jean-Christian Rostagni and Jon Kolkin

Adam Cave Fine Art, 115 1/2 E. Hargett St.: Works by North Carolina oils artist Jimmy Craig Womble II

Gallery C, 540 N. Blount St.: Oil paintings from the estate of English artist Harry Demaine

Nicole’s Studio and Art Gallery, 719 N. Person St.: “The Great Outdoors,” oil paintings of landscapes

Tir na nOg, 218 S. Blount St.: Inis Cairde, traditional Irish dancers

N.C. Museum of History, 5 E. Edenton St.: “Brewconomy” film with samples from local brewers featured in the film

Retro Modern Furnishings, 508 St. Mary’s St.: “Ordinary Moments” paintings by Sarah Sheffield

The Morning Times, 10 E. Hargett St.: Local artists, artisans and musicians

Block Gallery, 222 W. Hargett Street: “Sacred Spaces” exhibit

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