Smithfield Herald

Local author writes anti-terrorism novel

In his time with the Fayetteville Police Department, author Carl Wile of Four Oaks has been a patrol officer, detective and sergeant. He is now supervisor of the crime information center.
In his time with the Fayetteville Police Department, author Carl Wile of Four Oaks has been a patrol officer, detective and sergeant. He is now supervisor of the crime information center. kbettis@newsobserver.com

Could a terrorist secretly manipulate two Fayetteville street gangs fighting over turf? The scenario sounds far fetched, but it could very well occur, says author Carl Wile of Four Oaks.

Originally from Florida, Wile has worked for the Fayetteville Police Department for 18 years, most recently as supervisor of the Crime Information Center, which uses surveillance cameras perched around the city to monitor crime in real time.

His 628-page novel, titled “Baqir,” is about a terrorism plot in Fayetteville. Surrounded by the military culture of Fort Bragg and familiar with FBI agents and detective work, Wile figured he had material for a compelling detective novel.

When he started penning the novel, Wile admittedly struggled with FBI tactics and strategy. But as fortune would have it, he soon found himself on a joint terrorism task force, a subdivision of the FBI’s counter-terrorism department.

“Most of the book was fleshed out before the FBI (assignment) ever started,” he said. But the awareness of local activities and experiences helped him fine-tune the tactics used by the police detectives and FBI agents in his novel.

“It is not like what you see on TV – that’s just a cliche,” Wile said.

As for the novel, “none of the activities or associations are real; they are completely based on my imagination,” he said, although readers familiar with Fayetteville and its police department will recognize locations and characters.

As a detective, Wile had to learn to notice all details in a crime scene in order to testify effectively in court; it’s a skill that helped him provide perspective in the book.

Seven years ago, while sitting in his patrol car, Wile said, the scene in the book’s prologue – a young thug mixed up in plots unknown to him – occurred to him. Pulling out his car-mounted laptop, Wile began typing.

He self-published the book through amazon.com, and he has already written a draft of another book, this time nonfiction.

To buy the book, including a free Kindle download, visit Amazon.com.

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