Smithfield Herald

Machining program earns accreditation

Machining instructors Dwight Barnes, left, and Dexter Edwards are pictured with first- and second-year machining students.
Machining instructors Dwight Barnes, left, and Dexter Edwards are pictured with first- and second-year machining students. JOHNSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

The computer-integrated machining program at Johnston Community College has earned accreditation from the National Institute for Metalworking Skills, or NIMS.

The purpose of NIMS accreditation is to improve the quality of training programs as part of the national endeavor to build a globally competitive workforce while providing career opportunities.

JCC’s accreditation required several quality reviews by NIMS, including an on-site evaluation that occurred last fall. The evaluation included an inspection of the college’s metalworking shop and in-depth interviews with students, instructors, administrators, program advisory committee members and local employers.

Brian Worley, director of technology and vocational programs at JCC, said the accreditation is a tremendous accomplishment for the college and the Johnston County community. The accreditation will allow students to earn up to eight NIMS credentials while attending JCC, Worley noted.

“These credentials are nationally recognized and should help students become gainfully employed after graduation,” he said. “It also is a great economic-development tool as the county works to attract new industry. This accreditation will let those companies know that JCC is prepared to provide them with well-trained machinists.”

Worley also noted the important role two grants played in modernizing equipment that assisted in the NIMS accreditation process. The grants came from the Golden Leaf Foundation and the N.C. Community College System.

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