Southwest Wake News

Holly Springs to see new police station, co-working space in new year

The 28,000-square-foot law enforcement center, located at 750 Holly Springs Road, will include a state-of-the-art 911 call center and space for an emergency operations center. It was designed by architectural firm Stewart-Cooper-Newell Architects of Gastonia, which also designed Apex’s police station.
The 28,000-square-foot law enforcement center, located at 750 Holly Springs Road, will include a state-of-the-art 911 call center and space for an emergency operations center. It was designed by architectural firm Stewart-Cooper-Newell Architects of Gastonia, which also designed Apex’s police station. Town of Holly Springs

Holly Springs Police Department operations have been dispersed throughout town for years.

The 5,000-square-foot main office is at 110 W. Ballentine St. The evidence room is in the basement of Town Hall at 128 S. Main St., and some of the officers work out of a training room at Fire Station 2 at 1140 Avent Ferry Road.

But by mid-January, the Holly Springs Police Department will have a new home when a 28,000-square-foot law enforcement center opens at 750 Holly Springs Road. It will cost the town about $6 million, not including costs such as architect fees and furniture.

The investment also will make way for Holly Springs’ first co-working space to open in the Ballentine Street building, which Holly Springs’ economic development director, Jenny Mizelle, expects could happen as early as February.

Assistant Town Manager Daniel Weeks said that building, which was built in the early 1900s, has served as a railroad depot, a NAPA auto parts store and more.

“It really wasn’t built for a police department,” he said. “This new building will allow all those functions to be back under one roof.”

Construction began in October 2014. Once completed, the two-story law enforcement center will serve as the police department’s home for decades.

“This facility sets us up well for growth,” Weeks said. “We built this building to where it will still be our headquarters 20 or 30 years from now.”

The new building, which includes a state-of-the-art 911 call center and space for an emergency operations center, was constructed by Monteith Construction Corporation of Wilmington and was designed by architectural firm Stewart-Cooper-Newell Architects of Gastonia. The architects also designed Apex’s police station.

A new law enforcement center has been a priority for the Town of Holly Springs for years.

In 2010, the town conducted a space needs analysis, which determined that the town’s current square footage per officer was extremely low compared with national averages.

Weeks said the town now has about 105 square feet per officer, and the International Association of Chiefs or Police recommends 420 square feet. He said the new law enforcement center would provide nearly 400 square feet per officer.

The Holly Springs Police Department has about 60 sworn officers led by Police Chief John Herring.

Making room

Meanwhile, the new co-working space will allow Holly Springs to join a growing trend that can be found throughout the Triangle, including Cary, Raleigh, Wake Forest and Chapel Hill. They allow people in different jobs and careers to share a space for work.

At a Dec. 1 Holly Springs Town Council meeting, Mizelle introduced Jon Harol, a Holly Springs resident and businessman, who the staff is recommending to develop and operate the co-working space.

“I think Holly Springs has a lot of promise,” Harol said. “I think it has a lot of growth, and I think co-working is a great next step, especially for trying to bring some life into the downtown area.”

The space would feature dedicated work stations and shared space with access to standard office resources, including high-speed Internet, copy machines, parking and off-site staff to provide tenants with technical assistance. Rent for the facility would be set by the operator.

The co-working operator will be responsible for designing and launching the space, offering affordable and flexible rents, developing a marketing plan, managing the space and more. The town is willing to invest up to $50,000 to help up-fit the facility.

“I think the police department is a great place for it, and I think by doing this we are going to be able to bring a lot of foot traffic downtown,” Harol said.

Harol estimated having 30 to 50 seats to fill on a daily basis. Because not everyone needs to rent space every day, this would equate to nearly 100 different people working there during the week, he said.

“Everything points to this being a successful venture,” he said.

Harol said he also plans to offer discounted rental costs to nonprofit organizations.

Town staff will draft a three-year lease agreement for the West Ballentine Street property for the council to consider at its meeting on Jan. 19.

Kathryn Trogdon: 919-460-2608: @KTrogdon

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