Wake County

How’s the economy doing in your Wake County neighborhood? Use this map to find out.

New homes sprout from building materials at The Mills on Avent Ferry Road as Holly Springs continues to grow and neighborhoods are carved out of farms and woodlands. This photo was taken Dec. 8, 2017.
New homes sprout from building materials at The Mills on Avent Ferry Road as Holly Springs continues to grow and neighborhoods are carved out of farms and woodlands. This photo was taken Dec. 8, 2017. rwillett@newsobserver.com

Much of the data used to measure economic health – income, unemployment rate, population – are presented as statewide or county-wide figures. But those numbers can also provide insights about neighborhoods, from the affluent suburbs of Wake County to the fast-changing areas near downtown Raleigh.

The News & Observer compiled data and created an interactive map you can use to check out what’s happening in your Wake County neighborhood. We analyzed U.S. Census Bureau data from 2010, as the country was still struggling to recover from the recession, and 2016, using the annual American Community Survey.

Which neighborhoods have grown the most? Which have gotten richer, and which have gotten poorer? Where are the county’s lowest and highest unemployment rates?

The map help answer those questions.

Here’s an example of what these maps show: The population of census tract 540.18 in northeast Raleigh nearly doubled between 2010 and 2016. The tract spans the southwest corner of the intersection of Capital Boulevard and Interstate 540.

The number of people there living below the poverty line increased 19.1 percent – second among all Wake County tracts. But the percentage of residents with a bachelor’s degree or higher also saw a similar jump, and the tract had the highest increase in housing costs in the county.

Gargan: 919-829-4807; @hgargan

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