Crime

Jonathan Broyhill tells investigators he remembers Jamie Hahn screaming

Dr. Lauren Scott, a forensic pathologist for the Chief Medical Examiner’s office in Raleigh, testifies Monday as to the cutting wounds found upon the hand and arm of Jamie Hahn during Scott’s autopsy of Hahn in April 2013. Scott was the first witness on the fourth day of testimony in Jonathan Broyhill’s trial. Broyhill is accused of killing is charged in the murder of Jamie K. Hahn and attempting to kill her husband, Nation Hahn, in April 2013. Scott’s opinion is that Jamie Hahn died of multiple stab wounds from the attack.
Dr. Lauren Scott, a forensic pathologist for the Chief Medical Examiner’s office in Raleigh, testifies Monday as to the cutting wounds found upon the hand and arm of Jamie Hahn during Scott’s autopsy of Hahn in April 2013. Scott was the first witness on the fourth day of testimony in Jonathan Broyhill’s trial. Broyhill is accused of killing is charged in the murder of Jamie K. Hahn and attempting to kill her husband, Nation Hahn, in April 2013. Scott’s opinion is that Jamie Hahn died of multiple stab wounds from the attack. hlynch@newsobserver.com

Jurors at the Jonathan Broyhill murder trial on Monday got to hear from the man whose fate they will decide.

Prosecutors played a recording of Broyhill, in a soft voice, often barely audible, talking with investigators from his hospital room.

The 33-year-old man has been in Wake County Superior Court since Wednesday, sitting quietly by his defense team, as prosecutors lay out their case for a jury of seven women and five men.

Broyhill is accused of murdering Jamie Kirk Hahn, a political strategist and fundraiser, and attempting to kill her husband, Nation. Investigators contend the attack occurred amid questions about money missing from a campaign fund for former U.S. Congressman Brad Miller, a Democrat from Wake County.

In the hospital room, as a Raleigh investigator recorded the conversation, Broyhill spoke about the campaign-fund problems, the items that investigators had seized from his car and what he remembered from the violence that April afternoon.

The investigator asked Broyhill: “What do you remember when you stabbed Jamie?”

“I remember her screaming,” Broyhill recalled for the detective. “That’s all I remember.”

The trial has offered a glimpse of a nurturing relationship between the Hahns and Broyhill, the best man at their wedding.

The first four days of testimony also have depicted Broyhill as a troubled man, harboring many secrets.

Broyhill had worked for Jamie Hahn, the founder of Blue Sky, a political consulting firm. During the 2012 campaign season, Broyhill had been in charge of keeping the books for a campaign account for Miller.

During the first four months of 2013, while that campaign was winding down, questions surfaced about financial irregularities.

On April 22, 2013, when the frenzied knife attack left Jamie Hahn fatally wounded and Nation Hahn injured with defensive wounds, Broyhill had a box in his car with information about that account.

He had taken a knife in a backpack to the home of the Hahns, a couple he was often with, and according to his defense team, used the knife that caused the violence.

But defense attorneys have said Broyhill did not use that knife that April afternoon with plans to kill Jamie Hahn. They contend the troubled man wanted to end his own life.

Dr. Lauren Scott, a forensic pathologist with the Office of the Medical Examiner in Raleigh, testified on Monday that Jamie Hahn suffered from lacerations to her chest, neck, arms and head. The blade fully penetrated her liver and severed an artery.

Broyhill slashed his wrists that afternoon, according to testimony, and plunged the knife into his abdomen.

Broyhill’s defense team has acknowledged that he falsely claimed to have pancreatic cancer, gall bladder surgery and other ailments.

Prosecutors contend he feigned illness as the questions about the Miller account became more and more pressing. He also had made up stories, they contend, about what happened to the nearly $45,000 he had embezzled from the account.

A detective asked Broyhill in the hospital room nearly two years ago, whether he had ever intended to tell the truth about what happened.

“That’s a good question,” Broyhill responded.

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