Wake Ed

Wake County discussing Stough Elementary and new building program

Students at Helen Y. Stough Elementary in Raleigh arrive at the school in the morning of Oct. 4, 2011. The Wake County school system is considering whether to do a mix of new construction and partial renovations at Stough or to demolish what exists in favor of all-new construction.
Students at Helen Y. Stough Elementary in Raleigh arrive at the school in the morning of Oct. 4, 2011. The Wake County school system is considering whether to do a mix of new construction and partial renovations at Stough or to demolish what exists in favor of all-new construction. News & Observer file photo

Wake County school board members will discuss Wednesday the state of the current building program, the assumptions that will be used to develop the next program and how to renovate Stough Elementary School.

The agenda for Wednesday’s facilities committee meeting includes a staff update on the ongoing 2013 capital improvement program that includes $998 million in various school construction projects. The slowdown in growth has resulted in the number of new seats gained actually exceeding the amount of new students.

From there, staff will go into more detail with the board about the capital improvement plan assumptions that will be used for the next round of projects. Proposed changes from the current assumptions include:

▪ Reducing the number of special-ed classrooms as part of the inclusion/push-in model for special-education students;

▪ Opening new schools with temporary classrooms filled to 100 percent;

▪ Adding collaborative learning spaces to all schools;

▪ Increasing high school capacity to 2,262 students to offer more CTE programs;

▪ Increasing acreage of new school sites to meet increased environmental and regulatory requirements;

One of the items that could be included in the next building program is the renovation of Stough Elementary in Raleigh.

Staff will discuss three options for the Stough project. One option would include a mix of partial renovations and new construction. The other two options would involve completely demolishing the current buildings to replace with a brand new one.

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