Wake Ed

Wake County school board committee to review homework policy

Brooke Parrish, 14, works on homework in her living room in Rolesville, NC Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. The Rolesville Middle School student is recovering at home after recently receiving a liver transplant at Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh. She suffers from Hepatopulmonary syndrome, a condition which causes shortness of breath due to broadening blood vessels in the lungs of patients with liver disease. The only cure for this syndrome is a liver transplant. The Rolesville community rallied around the young girl and raised money for the transplant which can cost nearly $500,000.
Brooke Parrish, 14, works on homework in her living room in Rolesville, NC Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. The Rolesville Middle School student is recovering at home after recently receiving a liver transplant at Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh. She suffers from Hepatopulmonary syndrome, a condition which causes shortness of breath due to broadening blood vessels in the lungs of patients with liver disease. The only cure for this syndrome is a liver transplant. The Rolesville community rallied around the young girl and raised money for the transplant which can cost nearly $500,000. cliddy@newsobserver.com

The question of how to fairly and appropriately give homework to students is one of the issues that the Wake County school board’s policy committee will discuss Tuesday.

The meeting agenda includes a review of a revised homework policy, which says that “the amount of time necessary to complete the tasks should be reasonable in light of the age and maturity of the students and other assignments given to the students.”

In contrast, current rules and procedures are more specific and include guidelines of 20 minutes per day in K-2, 50 minutes in grades 3-5, 90 minutes in middle school and two hours in high school.

The revised policy also says that “teachers should take into consideration the differences in financial, educational and technological resources of students and their parents or guardians when making assignments.”

The new wording is more detailed than current R&P, which says that “homework assignments will not require the use of books or materials which are not readily available in the home or accessible to the student.”

School officials say the suggested wording for the revised homework policy comes from the N.C. School Boards Association.

Other policy revisions that will be reviewed Tuesday are moment of silence, special education programs/rights of students with disabilities, recognizing excellence, citizenship and character education, student voter registration and hunter education.

Wake is in the midst of reviewing and readopting all of its policies to match the N.C. School Boards Association’s policy manual.

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