Wake Ed

Wake County schools may steer students to jobs such as policing

Raleigh Police Youth and Family Services officer Vince Doxbeck teaches a lesson under the new LEADER program to a group of 5th graders at Stough Elementary school in Raleigh on Oct. 20, 2015. The Wake County school system may launch a new program to encourage students to go into careers in public safety, including law enforcement.
Raleigh Police Youth and Family Services officer Vince Doxbeck teaches a lesson under the new LEADER program to a group of 5th graders at Stough Elementary school in Raleigh on Oct. 20, 2015. The Wake County school system may launch a new program to encourage students to go into careers in public safety, including law enforcement. cseward@newsobserver.com

The Wake County school system could launch a new effort to recruit the next generation of police officers, firefighters, teachers, farmers, architects, physical therapists and engineers.

The agenda for Monday’s school board student achievement committee meeting includes a presentation on six innovative school models that can help prepare students for life after graduation. The six models are design, education, farm, “grand challenges of engineering,” “intergenerational” and public safety.

Within each model is a set of potential jobs that students could pursue after graduation. School officials say those models cover industries that are in short supply of needed employees.

For instance, Wake says over the next 10 years there’s a need in the county for 421 more architects, 5,653 preK-12 teachers, 27,483 food industry workers, 1,731 home health aides and 1,114 law-enforcement officers.

The challenge will be finding funding for offering these six models.

Other agenda topics Monday are:

▪ An overview of what steps will be taken following a Feb. 29 community forum at Southeast Raleigh High School on student discipline and academic achievement outcomes;

▪ Presentation of 2016-17 calendar revisions that are not supposed to be major.

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