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The Lay’s potato chips in the bag aren’t the type on the bag. That can be a fatal problem

What to do if you think you have a recalled product

There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.
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There are many numbers and dates on the foods, drugs, cosmetics, and other products we use every day. When unsafe products must be removed from the market, these numbers and dates can help identify them quickly.

Putting one kind of potato chip in the bags meant for another kind of potato chip might be a chuckle worthy snafu unless a food allergy gets involved. That’s why Frito-Lay recalled Lay’s Lightly Salted Barbecue potato chips distributed in 24 states.

Or, rather, recalled bags that say “Lay’s Lightly Salted Barbecue potato chips.” That flavor doesn’t have milk. The flavor of potato chips that got mistakenly put in the recalled bags, according to the Frito-Lay-written, FDA-posted recall notice, has milk. No problem other than taste disappointment to those who don’t have a milk allergy. Major problem to those who do.

“People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the product contained inside the recalled potato chips bags,” the recall notice says.

The recalled bags have a “guaranteed fresh” date of Aug. 27, 2019 and, beneath that date, a manufacturing code that will have “2” and “9” as the second and third digits. The bags went to California, Texas, Missouri, Mississippi, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Anyone with questions about this recall can call 1-800-352-4477 from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday.

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Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about Panthers (NHL and FIU), Dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors and all manner of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He does not work Indianapolis 500 Race Day.

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