Politics & Government

Here are the constitutional amendments we’ll be voting on in North Carolina

More from the series


North Carolina constitutional amendments

Coverage from The Charlotte Observer, The News & Observer and The Herald-Sun of the constitutional amendments you’ll vote on in the November 2018 elections.

Expand All

North Carolina voters will have an opportunity to approve or deny six proposed amendments to the state constitution during the election this November.

All six potential changes were written by the Republican-controlled General Assembly, and the N.C. Republican Party is encouraging people to approve all six. Meanwhile, the N.C. Democratic Party is encouraging people to vote against all six.

Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and the N.C. NAACP had challenged four of the amendments in court, trying to keep them from being on the ballot at all, but both their lawsuits were denied by the N.C. Supreme Court.

They had questioned the wording legislators approved to be on the ballot, calling it misleading, after the legislature prohibited the state’s Constitutional Amendments Publication Commission — made up of two Democrats and a Republican — from writing the ballot descriptions.

An Elon University Poll in early September found that registered voters around the state are largely uninformed about the amendments and what they would do if they are approved.

Unlike some other states, North Carolina does not frequently amend its constitution. The last amendments were the 2012 amendment to ban gay marriage, which was later overturned in federal court, and the 2014 amendment to let criminal defendants waive their right to a jury trial. And it’s even more rare for North Carolina voters to see so many amendment proposals in a single year.

Here’s what the six amendments do.

Create a voter ID requirement for in-person voting. The legislature will write the details if the amendment passes.

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment to require voters to provide photo identification before voting in person.

Read the full legislation.

Make the maximum possible state income tax rate 7 percent, lowering the cap from 10 percent. This would not change anyone’s current tax bill, since the North Carolina personal income tax rate is now 5.499 percent.

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment to reduce the income tax rate in North Carolina to a maximum allowable rate of seven percent (7%).

Read the full legislation.

Give legislators a major role in choosing who should fill judicial vacancies, limiting the governor’s power.

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment to change the process for filling judicial vacancies that occur between judicial elections from a process in which the Governor has sole appointment power to a process in which the people of the State nominate individuals to fill vacancies by way of a commission comprised of appointees made by the judicial, executive, and legislative branches charged with making recommendations to the legislature as to which nominees are deemed qualified; then the legislature will recommend at least two nominees to the Governor via legislative action not subject to gubernatorial veto; and the Governor will appoint judges from among these nominees.

Read the full legislation.

Protect hunting and fishing, and make hunting and fishing “a preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife.”

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment protecting the right of the people to hunt, fish, and harvest wildlife.

Read the full legislation.

Change the State Board of Ethics and Elections Enforcement from nine members to eight members, leaving four members from each party but removing the ninth seat that’s now reserved for an unaffiliated person. The amendment would also take away the governor’s power to choose members of the elections board, and give that power to the legislature.

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment to establish an eight-member Bipartisan Board of Ethics and Elections Enforcement in the Constitution to administer ethics and elections law.

Read the full legislation.

Add rights in the legal system for victims of felony crimes.

What you’ll see on the ballot:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST

Constitutional amendment to strengthen protections for victims of crime; to establish certain absolute basic rights for victims; and to ensure the enforcement of these rights.

Read the full legislation.



Follow more of our reporting on NC Constitutional Amendments

See all 10 stories
  Comments