Under the Dome

Senator resigns and takes a job that pays $100,000 more

Sen. Angela Bryant confers with then-state Sen. Josh Stein on the floor in the Senate chambers in Raleigh in 2015.  Bryant resigned her seat over the weekend and was appointed to the state's Post-Release Supervision and Parole Commission on Monday.
Sen. Angela Bryant confers with then-state Sen. Josh Stein on the floor in the Senate chambers in Raleigh in 2015. Bryant resigned her seat over the weekend and was appointed to the state's Post-Release Supervision and Parole Commission on Monday.

State Sen. Angela Bryant, a Nash County Democrat, resigned her seat over the weekend and was appointed to the state's Post-Release Supervision and Parole Commission on Monday.

Bryant's official resignation letter was dated and effective Sunday, but was not received by the Senate principal clerk until 1:20 p.m. on Monday. Her appointment was announced by press release from Gov. Roy Cooper's office at 2:04 p.m.

"Thanks so much for the opportunity to serve the State in this great institution with the many great colleagues over my eleven years," Bryant wrote in her letter. "I am also very thankful to the constituents of, at first House District 7, and then later Senate District 4, for electing me to serve in the legislature for six terms."

Bryant had previously announced that she wasn't going to seek re-election, after redistricting made her district more favorable to Republicans.

State law sets Bryant's salary at $116,595 annually, which is substantially more than her legislative salary at nearly $14,000.

Democratic Party leaders in her district — which includes parts of Halifax, Nash, Vance, Wilson and Warren counties — will have to vote on who will replace Bryant for the remainder of her term. Judge Milton "Toby" Fitch, a former House member and newly retired Superior Court judge, is running for the seat in November. Fitch said he intends to seek the appointment to Bryant's seat. If successful, he would then be considered an incumbent in November.

The newly drawn district includes Edgecombe, Wilson and Halifax counties. Richard Scott, a Halifax County Republican, is running for the seat. Libertarian candidate Jesse Shearin is also running.

In announcing Bryant's appointment Monday, Cooper said that she has a "strong track record of diligent, thoughtful service to our state and I know that will continue in her new role on the Parole Board."

The state parole board is a four-member commission appointed by Cooper. It's an independent agency that is responsible for granting parole to offenders who have met the state's requirements. It doesn't hold formal hearings, nor does it meet with offenders to review cases.

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