State Politics

Six things to know about North Carolina’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention

Raleigh entrepreneur blasts House Bill 2 in Democratic convention speech

North Carolina’s House Bill 2 is driving away business and hurting the entire country’s reputation, Raleigh entrepreneur Jesse Lipson of Citrix told the Democratic National Convention Monday night.
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North Carolina’s House Bill 2 is driving away business and hurting the entire country’s reputation, Raleigh entrepreneur Jesse Lipson of Citrix told the Democratic National Convention Monday night.

About 150 delegates and alternate delegates from North Carolina have arrived in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention, where they’ll hold a formal vote this week to nominate Hillary Clinton for president.

Here are some details about the state’s delegation:

How many votes will each candidate get from North Carolina? Based on the March 15 primary results, Hillary Clinton will receive 60 of the state’s pledged delegates, and Bernie Sanders will get 47.

What about the superdelegates? According to an Associated Press survey, 11 of North Carolina’s superdelegates say they plan to vote for Clinton, while two plan to vote for Sanders. Superdelegates aren’t required to vote based on primary results and can pick whichever candidate they prefer. Nationally, most superdelegates plan to vote for Clinton, prompting Sanders’ supporters to complain that the system is “rigged.”

Who are North Carolina’s superdelegates? The state’s three Democratic members of Congress – Reps. David Price, G.K. Butterfield and Alma Adams – serve as superdelegates. Three others are elected officials who get to be superdelegates because of their leadership roles in the party: State Treasurer Janet Cowell, Cumberland County Commissioner Jeanette Council and Mecklenburg County Commissioner Pat Cotham. The other eight are state party officials, most of them elected by party members to serve on the Democratic National Committee. They include state party chairwoman Patsy Keever, Goldman Sachs lobbyist Joyce Brayboy, St. Augustine’s University president Everett Ward and East Carolina University development director Zack Hawkins.

How are the regular delegates selected? The N.C. Democratic Party elects them at conventions in each congressional district and at the statewide convention in June.

Notable names among the regular delegates: Wake County Democratic Party Chairman Brian Fitzsimmons is a Clinton delegate. So is Wake County Commissioner Jessica Holmes. N.C. Association of Educators President Mark Jewell is also a Clinton delegate.

Longtime Durham activist Lavonia Allison is serving as a Sanders delegate. Wendy Ella May, a transgender Johnston County commissioner candidate, is an alternate Sanders delegate.

And 12 state legislators are all pledged to Clinton: Rep. Cecil Brockman of High Point, Sen. Don Davis of Greene County, Rep. Beverly Earle of Charlotte, Rep. Rosa Gill of Raleigh, Rep. Pricey Harrison of Greensboro, Sen. Paul Lowe of Winston-Salem, Sen. Floyd McKissick of Durham, Rep. Graig Meyer of Hillsborough, Rep. Rodney Moore of Charlotte, Rep. Bobbie Richardson of Louisburg, Rep. Chris Sgro of Greensboro and Sen. Erica Smith-Ingram of Northampton County. Secretary of State Elaine Marshall is also a Clinton delegate.

Outside of the nominating vote and convention speeches, what will the North Carolina delegation be doing in Philadelphia? Delegates will have coffee on Wednesday with former state Rep. Deborah Ross, the Democratic Party candidate for U.S. Senate. They’ll hear from daily breakfast speakers at the delegation’s suburban Philadelphia hotel, including Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy, U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota and U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell of Alabama. And they’ll attend plenty of parties scheduled throughout the week.

Colin Campbell: 919-829-4698, @RaleighReporter

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