North Carolina

This time, a real WWII bomb was found along a Carolina shore

A photo of the World War II-era bomb found on Hatteras Island Tuesday, July 18, 2017.
A photo of the World War II-era bomb found on Hatteras Island Tuesday, July 18, 2017. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

For the second time in less than a week, a World War II-era military device has washed up along the shore of Hatteras Island.

While the object discovered last week proved to be a training Ordnance, seashore officials say the latest object was an actual bomb.

National Park Service law enforcement discovered the “drop-bomb” midday Tuesday on the southernmost tip of the island.

The site is about 13 miles away from “Shelly Island,” a sandbar that has formed off the tip of Cape Point since the spring, where the training ordnance was found July 14.

Both times, the Navy sent an Explosive OrdNance Disposal team to examine and dispose of the objects. The bomb squad’s visit Wednesday included a precautionary detonation.

“In this case they were more concerned it was not a training device, so that’s why they did detonate it in place to render it safe,” said Boone Vandzura, chief ranger for Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

It is unclear at this time whether the bomb exploded during the controlled detonation.

Vandzura said there have been no other discoveries like these two in at least a couple of years.

“The disposal of two unexploded OrdNances in the last six days serves as a reminder of the part the Outer Banks played during World War II,” Outer Banks Group Superintendent David Hallac said in a statement. “I greatly appreciate the support the U.S. Navy has provided.”

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