South Carolina

USPS helps bust up marijuana ring that connected SC to California, police say

Consequences for drug-related arrests in South Carolina

Dozens of people are charged with drug-related charges each month in Horry County. Here are the consequences if you are caught with drugs in South Carolina.
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Dozens of people are charged with drug-related charges each month in Horry County. Here are the consequences if you are caught with drugs in South Carolina.

Maybe they never thought the post office would bust them but the stamp selling agency did.

Sumter Police Department teamed up with the United States Postal Service’s inspection officers and netted four arrests in what they say was a scheme to move marijuana across the country into the Midland’s county. The two agencies announced the bust up Saturday.

Leroy Dixon, 51, would buy marijuana from a California “co-conspirator” and have the drug mailed to Sumter, according to police. His wife, Lantanya Dixon, 41, would pick up the packages and bring them to the couple’s house in the county east of Richland. The duo moved at least 500 pounds of marijuana into Sumter, the police department said.

Investigators allege that Tyrese Washington, 18, would also help to move the marijuana as well as Gregory McCabe, 34, and Cedric Stevens, 49. All lived in Sumter.

The investigation done by Sumter Police Department’s vice squad and the USPS took months, authorities said.

The post office put together a “controlled delivery of two parcels” on Feb. 6, according to Sumter police. After the packages were in, a warrant was served at the Dixon’s home, and local and federal officers found eight pounds of marijuana ready for sale. Inside the controlled delivery packages was six pounds of marijuana, investigators said.

“The investigation is continuing and more arrests are expected,” the Sumter Police Department stated.

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David Travis Bland won the South Carolina Press Association’s 2017 Judson Chapman Award for community journalism. As The State’s crime, police and public safety reporter, he strives to inform communities about crimes that affect them and give deeper insight into victims, the accused and law enforcement. He studied history with a focus on the American South at the University of South Carolina.


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