Weather

Rivers still high, flooding remains a danger for eastern NC

The Tar River roils as it cascades over the spillway at the Rocky Mount Mill Pond on the Tar River in Rocky Mount, N.C., Thursday, April 27, 2017. Floodwaters have started to subside in the town after the heavy rains earlier this week but a steady stream of onlookers were coming to the city park to watch the floodwaters tumble over the spillway.
The Tar River roils as it cascades over the spillway at the Rocky Mount Mill Pond on the Tar River in Rocky Mount, N.C., Thursday, April 27, 2017. Floodwaters have started to subside in the town after the heavy rains earlier this week but a steady stream of onlookers were coming to the city park to watch the floodwaters tumble over the spillway. cliddy@newsobserver.com

After last week’s record breaking rain, many rivers in North Carolina still were flooded and could create hazards.

The Neuse River in Goldsboro exceeded its major flood stage of 24 feet on Saturday and waters continued to rise slowly until the river crested at about 24.4 feet Sunday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

At minor to moderate flood stage, the river in Goldsboro floods Ferry Bridge and Arrington Bridge Road along with access roads around Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. Riverview Trailer Park homes and Stevens Mill Road begin to flood at about 21 feet and flooding begins on Seymour Johnson at about 22 feet.

The Neuse in Smithfield was steadily falling on Sunday, but expected to rise again Sunday night into Monday.

The river crested in Smithfield last Thursday at about 24.5 feet, according to the Weather Service. The river reached more than 29 feet during Hurricane Matthew.

The river had fallen to about 11.4 feet Sunday morning but was expected to reach flood stage again by Tuesday and rise as high as 15.7 feet, moderate flood stage, by Thursday.

At 14 feet, the Neuse in Smithfield begins to overflow the left bank. At 15 feet, it floods along the Neuse riverwalk and water nears the base of the holding tank at the water treatment plant.

The Tar River in Rocky Mount had just fallen below major flood stage Thursday and Friday but was still in its moderate flood stage of about 23 feet on Sunday and was expected to begin falling sharply Monday and through next week.

At 23 feet, the river in Rocky Mount flows into the city sewer system, flooding reaches Melton Drive and East Ridge Street and streets west of U.S. 301 Business flood.

The Tar River in Greenville was still rising on Sunday at about 17.24 feet. The river was expected to continue to rise slowly before it crests at about 18 feet Tuesday evening before beginning a slow descent.

At 18 feet, the river in Greenville floods low land around the river including farmland across Pitt County, secondary roads near the river and some residential areas.

N.C. Department of Emergency Management tips for flooding safety:

▪ Never drive into flooded areas or across flooded roads.

▪ Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of fast moving water can knock over an adult.

▪ Follow detours and obey traffic barricades that close off roads.

▪ Never park or camp along streams, rivers or creeks.

For the latest flooding information, download the ReadyNC mobile app and check the flood gauges nearest you. For real-time travel information, got to DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on Twitter.

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