Weather

Update: Tropical low headed toward the Carolinas on Monday likely to become tropical storm

Forecasters predict above average Atlantic hurricane season in 2017

National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration forecasters said the Atlantic Ocean's 2017 hurricane season will likely be above normal, with 11 to 17 named storms, five to nine hurricanes and two to four major storms.
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National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration forecasters said the Atlantic Ocean's 2017 hurricane season will likely be above normal, with 11 to 17 named storms, five to nine hurricanes and two to four major storms.

Editor’s note: The latest information about the storm is being updated here.

A tropical low headed toward the coast of the Carolinas on Monday and Tuesday could grow stronger, becoming a tropical storm.

A tropical storm watch was issued for the North Carolina coast Sunday evening.

The National Hurricane Center on Sunday reported that an elongated area of low pressure, previously over northeast Florida, had emerged over the western Atlantic and was about 60 miles east of the coast of Georgia.

Showers and thunderstorms associated with the system increased and became better organized, meaning the low will likely become a tropical depression or storm Sunday night or Monday before it merges with a cold front. If it becomes a storm, it will be called Tropical Storm Irma.

Regardless of how the system develops, the low was expected to cause increased winds, heavy rain and rough surf along the Georgia, North and South Carolina coasts on Sunday and through mid-week.

Bands of heavy wind and rain could move into Central North Carolina early in the week, the National Weather Service forecast Sunday evening.

The most likely track of the storm shows it touching North Carolina’s shores late Monday or early Tuesday. The storm likely will graze Virginia’s coast some time Tuesday evening before turning out to sea, the weather service forecast on Sunday.

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