Weather

‘This storm is pretty intense.’ Gov. Cooper warns NC residents to stay off roads.

Gov. Roy Cooper urges workers to go home before storm gets worse

A slow-moving storm lumbered into North Carolina Wednesday, threatening 6 inches of snow in the Triangle as temperatures dropped to freezing. Gov. Roy Cooper described road conditions as “extremely hazardous” and urged workers statewide to go home
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A slow-moving storm lumbered into North Carolina Wednesday, threatening 6 inches of snow in the Triangle as temperatures dropped to freezing. Gov. Roy Cooper described road conditions as “extremely hazardous” and urged workers statewide to go home

A slow-moving storm lumbered into North Carolina Wednesday, threatening 6 inches of snow in the Triangle as temperatures dropped to freezing. Gov. Roy Cooper described road conditions as “extremely hazardous” and urged workers statewide to go home before conditions worsen.

The Triangle woke to cloudy skies and none of the promised accumulation, but Cooper warned that the storm is slower than expected and could dump as much as 8 inches over the state in its longer-than-expected stay.

“If it hasn’t reached you yet,” he said in a Raleigh news conference Wednesday morning, “it’s probably going to get there soon.”

Check out the ABC11 weather forecast as we head into colder weather and the possibility of snow.

The state Department of Transportation poured 2 million gallons of salt brine on roads statewide to stave off icy conditions. By 10 a.m. Wednesday, the state Highway Patrol had reported 546 collisions across the state, most of them in the mountain counties where snow began falling Tuesday night.

Nearly all of North Carolina’s 115 school systems closed or shortened school schedules, Cooper said.

Most of the state is under a winter storm warning, and others are under a winter storm advisory.

Ice and snow-covered roads remained dangerous in the Triangle on Friday morning. A warming trend over the next few days is expected to improve conditions.

“Be careful today,” said Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon. “Especially if you’re in the Piedmont as temperatures fall this evening travel conditions will get extremely hazardous.”

Flakes began whipping across Raleigh roads just as Cooper began speaking, though they quickly melted into puddles on the ground.

Temperatures should quickly drop through the afternoon, allowing snow to accumulate by as much as an inch an hour.

With the potential of winter weather this week, here are some tips for driving on icy or snow-covered roads.

“This storm is pretty intense,” Cooper said.

Overnight freezing will lead to icy conditions Thursday, Cooper said, but temperatures should rise and hopefully lead to a thaw by the weekend.

Most of the Piedmont is expected to get 5 to 8 inches of snow, with 2 to 4 inches across the central and northern Coastal Plain counties and 1 to 2 inches in the far southeastern counties, the National Weather Service in Raleigh reported Wednesday morning.

If motorists must be on the road, they’re encouraged to increase their distance between cars, monitor speed, plan for delays and avoid distraction while driving. Do not call 911 or *HP for updates on road conditions. Instead, check drivenc.gov.

Camila Molina: 919-829-4538, @Cmolina__

Snow-covered trees and ice-covered roads in Cary, NC Thursday morning, Jan. 18,2018. A winter storm dumped several inches in the Triangle Wednesday. Neighborhood streets are still icy and snow-covered.

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