Letters to the Editor

The legislature’s plan to take over judicial selection is an ‘absolute grab for power’

Sen. Ralph Hise, a Mitchell County Republican standing at right, is on a N.C. Senate Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting. The committee is reviewing possible changes that include abandoning the election of North Carolina judges for a selection system.
Sen. Ralph Hise, a Mitchell County Republican standing at right, is on a N.C. Senate Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting. The committee is reviewing possible changes that include abandoning the election of North Carolina judges for a selection system. N&O file photo

Regarding “NC lawmakers push for prominent role in selecting judges who rule on their laws” (June 21): There is no sunshine in the GOP proposal for the so-called Judicial Vacancy Sunshine Amendment. This is not even a thinly veiled attempt to hijack the NC Courts.

The GOP really seems to think that N.C. voters cannot see through this gimmick. The absolute grab for power to continue to stack the deck is appalling.

Rep. Marcia Morey was very astute in her statement that this bill is nefarious, and I hope that voters will see through it and say no to changing the selection of judges. The ill will shown towards our elected governor has not stopped. This attempt to strip the office of one more governing body is shameful and disingenuous.

Voters need to speak up, speak out and show up to cast their vote this November. We still have the power to stop this madness.

Jerome Brown

Chairman

Wake County Voter Education Coalition

School ‘apathy’

Regarding “School bond referendum won’t be in November” (June 24): I walked the halls of the N.C. General Assembly on a quest to find out anything I could about the school bond. I learned what I suspected even before reading the article on the school bond. The bond was dead, and few in the halls of the legislature cared.

North Carolina, I’m asking you to care. One of the biggest unresolved issues related to the class size mandate is space. While the school bond wouldn’t have been large enough to fix the mandate problem in Wake County, it certainly would have provided some relief. The school bond could have helped our crumbling schools in rural counties.

If anyone was listening to the teachers they would know about rickety trailers, broken air conditioners, mold and leaking roofs. In fact, leaders at the May 16 march specifically asked for the school bond to go forward.

So when the heating at your kids’ school dies, do me a favor and write Phil Berger. When another classroom gets infested, tweet at Tim Moore. Even more important, take a stand for public education in November. Our schools can’t afford any more apathy.

Susan Book

Save Our Schools NC

Invest in farmers

Regarding “GOP-led House narrowly passes farm bill” (June 21): Every five years our elected representatives in Washington, D.C., debate the Farm Bill – legislation that sets the table for America’s nutrition and agricultural policy.

Specialty crops, which include fruits, vegetables and nuts, to name a few, are relatively new participants in the Farm Bill. But they serve as the backbone of nutritious eating choices in the U.S., and as a major economic engine for our nation and North Carolina.

As a member of the Specialty Crop Farm Bill Alliance (SCFBA), a coalition of more than 120 organizations representing the specialty crop industry, I urge lawmakers to allocate funds to the following areas: We must invest in research to address key challenges of sustaining all components of agriculture, policies that provide technological assistance to producers, programs that combat invasive pests and diseases, healthy eating options for low-income families, block grants that stabilize agriculture production for growers and improving access for producers to foreign markets and growth.

Specialty crops are instrumental in providing healthy food to Americans as well as competing in an increasingly global marketplace. Enhancing the Farm Bill’s commitment to the U.S. specialty crop industry will produce a strong return on investment for all of America, not just farmers.

Greg Cardamone

General Manager of Potatoes and Vegetables

L&M Companies

Church and state?

Sessions distorts verse to say laws are God’s will” (June 20) argues that other biblical sources allow disobeying civil authority, but nowhere does the author make the point that the days of ruling by divine right are, happily, now in the past.

Certainly in a republican country like ours that separates church and state, mandates from Christian (or any other) scripture should not be the basis of our civil laws.

Michael Cotter

Chapel Hill

  Comments