North Carolina

What Duke, UNC and NCSU basketball programs are doing in wake of FBI investigation

UNC's Roy Williams on FBI indictments: 'It was a sad day for college basketball

University of North Carolina basketball coach Roy Williams tells reporters that he was shocked on the day the FBI indictments and wide-ranging investigation into illegal activities involving schools and recruits was announced.
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University of North Carolina basketball coach Roy Williams tells reporters that he was shocked on the day the FBI indictments and wide-ranging investigation into illegal activities involving schools and recruits was announced.

The FBI’s investigation into bribery, fraud and corruption in college basketball has had a ripple effect in college compliance offices.

In wake of the FBI probe into two college basketball schemes and charges levied, several schools have conducted internal reviews of their compliance operations, including North Carolina, N.C. State and Duke.

The Associated Press reported Monday it has asked 84 schools with major basketball programs how they responded to the FBI investigation that resulted in the arrests of 10. The AP said 64 schools responded and 28 reported they were conducting the internal compliance reviews.

“Since news of the FBI’s investigation, we are doing many of the same things we suspect most universities are, including talking directly to our coaches and staff,” UNC spokesman Steve Kirschner said Tuesday. “Our Director of Athletics (Bubba Cunningham) and our sport administrators are in constant contact with our coaches across all sports, and we also have coaches meetings every month where we talk about compliance and rules. We are discussing, and will continue to discuss, this topic with our coaches and staff.”

UNC basketball coach Roy Williams tells reporters that he is confident that any of the players he is still recruiting are clear of any wrongdoing in the ongoing FBI investigation.

N.C. State’s compliance staff is headed by senior associate director Carrie Doyle, who previously worked for NCAA enforcement as an investigator for seven years.

NCSU spokesman Fred Demarest said Doyle regularly meets with the men’s basketball coaching and support staff and will continue to hold those meetings. Demarest said NCSU’s internal reviews constituted no change in the school’s compliance process.

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N.C. State head basketball coach Kevin Keatts speaks to the media in September. The school’s senior associate director Carrie Doyle regularly meets with the men’s basketball coaching and support staff and will continue to hold those meetings. Ethan Hyman ehyman@newsobserver.com

At Duke, spokesman Jon Jackson said the Blue Devils are “constantly assessing policies and practices with all our sports to ensure compliance.”

“In addition, we often take a more detailed look at compliance policies and practices when there are widely publicized reports of alleged misconduct, as we will do following the news of the federal investigation,” Jackson said. “As always, we welcome and appreciate any guidance that the NCAA provides in these kinds of situations.”

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Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski directs his team against Troy in March. According to the school, Duke is “constantly assessing policies and practices with all our sports to ensure compliance.” Chuck Liddy cliddy@newsobserver.com

In September, the FBI arrested 10 people, including four basketball coaches and adidas executives, in connection with its bribery and corruption investigation.

The coaches arrested were Lamont Evans, an associate coach of Oklahoma State; Chuck Person, an associate coach of Auburn; Emanuel “Book” Richardson, an assistant coach at Arizona, and Tony Bland, an associate coach at Southern California.

The FBI said bribes were being paid to the coaches to steer athletes toward certain financial advisers and managers, or steer athletes toward adidas once in the NBA. Other charges involved allegations the families of high-school athletes were paid as a way to get their sons to attend certain schools.

Chip Alexander: 919-829-8945, @ice_chip

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