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Milton Senter has never thought about retiring

Fuquay-Varina baseball coach, the fourth NCHSAA coach to 600 wins, looks on during a 7-4 win on Wednesday, April 29, against Fayetteville Pine Forest. The game was Milton Senter's 600th victory.
Fuquay-Varina baseball coach, the fourth NCHSAA coach to 600 wins, looks on during a 7-4 win on Wednesday, April 29, against Fayetteville Pine Forest. The game was Milton Senter's 600th victory. newsobserver.com

Fuquay-Varina High baseball coach Milton Senter notched his 600th career baseball coaching victory last week.

Q. What is your best memory of your high school playing career at Fuquay?

Senter: During my playing career I was just OK. I was a decent player, all-conference in baseball and basketball, but nothing really spectacular. I played on some pretty bad teams. I think we were 1-21 in basketball one year and only won two or three baseball games. But I remember the relationships. I’ve always tried to stress that to my teams. Whether you play a little or a lot, it is the relationships that you will remember. Just being with one another. Being a team. That’s what I remember and what I think my players will remember.

Q. Ever think of retiring?

Senter: No, not ever. I’m a part-time teacher now and I enjoy the classroom. I’ve got really good people working with me. I’m one of the lucky ones. I found what I liked to do early in life and I’ve stayed with it.

Q. Do you still throw batting practice and work on the field?

Senter: In the off season I probably throw 1,000 pitches a day five days a week. In the spring, all of the guys who work with me can throw so I don’t throw on the field that much. But the field is pretty much mine. I have some standards and we work to meet them.

Q. You have some demanding standards for your players, too. On and off the field, right?

Senter: We ask a lot of our players. We demand a lot of their time. We tell them that if they are willing to put in the work that they can be a part of the team. But we expect them to do things the right way when they play, when they practice, when they are at school and when they are away from the school. But kids make mistakes. One year we had a problem and had to pull up a lot of the jayvee players to the varsity. But that team, playing with about half of who had been our varsity starters, got to within one game of the state finals.

Q. What is the most satisfying part of coaching?

Senter: Seeing the kids later. The vast majority don’t go on to play baseball in college, but the vast majority do become good citizens. When you see one of them in the store and they come up to talk to you. That is a great feeling.

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