A photo taken nearly 50 years ago of Johnny Cash performing in the prison cafeteria is displayed in the prison museum at Folsom State prison in Folsom. When Johnny Cash sang one of the most famous lyrics in American history, “I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die” behind the walls of Folsom State Prison on January 13, 1968, it became one of the world’s most famous penitentiaries. Cash’s Folsom Prison Blues anchored a live album recorded in front of hundreds of inmates in the cafeteria that went to No. 1 in both the pop and country western charts over a decade.
A photo taken nearly 50 years ago of Johnny Cash performing in the prison cafeteria is displayed in the prison museum at Folsom State prison in Folsom. When Johnny Cash sang one of the most famous lyrics in American history, “I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die” behind the walls of Folsom State Prison on January 13, 1968, it became one of the world’s most famous penitentiaries. Cash’s Folsom Prison Blues anchored a live album recorded in front of hundreds of inmates in the cafeteria that went to No. 1 in both the pop and country western charts over a decade. Courtesy of Folsom State Prison Via AP
A photo taken nearly 50 years ago of Johnny Cash performing in the prison cafeteria is displayed in the prison museum at Folsom State prison in Folsom. When Johnny Cash sang one of the most famous lyrics in American history, “I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die” behind the walls of Folsom State Prison on January 13, 1968, it became one of the world’s most famous penitentiaries. Cash’s Folsom Prison Blues anchored a live album recorded in front of hundreds of inmates in the cafeteria that went to No. 1 in both the pop and country western charts over a decade. Courtesy of Folsom State Prison Via AP