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NC college will welcome Georgia high school’s first black male valedictorian this fall

‘I can lead the way for others,’ Vancleave student second-ever African American valedictorian

Khadeejah Franklin is not your average 18-year-old high school student. Franklin is involved in clubs, student council, three sports and on top of that juggling college classes. Her hard work has resulted in her being Vancleave's valedictorian.
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Khadeejah Franklin is not your average 18-year-old high school student. Franklin is involved in clubs, student council, three sports and on top of that juggling college classes. Her hard work has resulted in her being Vancleave's valedictorian.

The first African-American male valedictorian at his high school in Georgia is coming to North Carolina for college.

And a video of him rapping to celebrate his achievements has amassed nearly half a million views.

Rawlin Tate Jr. took 21 AP classes, has a 4.7 GPA, “received over $1 million in scholarship offers” and is the first black male to be valedictorian in Woodland High School’s history, according to the school. Now he’s going to North Carolina A&T State University on a full academic scholarship, the high school said.

“You are an inspiration to many and we are so proud of all of your accomplishments,” the school said in a Facebook post.

His new university also shouted him out on Twitter.

“Congratulations!! Welcome to ,” North Carolina A&T State University wrote.

Tate tweeted that he was also ranked number one in his class for seven years in a row, was accepted to 14 colleges and was a member of seven national honors societies.

He’s also a recording artist, an oboist, a concert pianist and an athlete on two varsity sports teams, according to his Twitter.

He showed off his musical chops in a video posted to Twitter.

The high school senior’s lowest grade on his transcript was a 98, and he never made below an A in his academic career, according to 11Alive.

“I’ve always been high achieving but to this degree — I’ve never really experienced this,” Tate told 11Alive. “I didn’t even know what a valedictorian was going into high school. I’ve just kept doing what I was doing, and now I’m here.”

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