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Triangle Restaurant Week starts today with plenty of tables still up for grabs

Viceroy in downtown Durham combines British and Indian cuisines. The two cultures are inextricably linked by centuries of history, and Viceroy’s menu takes a fresh, modern look at the relationship. It is taking part in Triangle Restaurant Week.
Viceroy in downtown Durham combines British and Indian cuisines. The two cultures are inextricably linked by centuries of history, and Viceroy’s menu takes a fresh, modern look at the relationship. It is taking part in Triangle Restaurant Week. jleonard@newsobserver.com

The pit of winter and the summer swelter can be the doldrums for restaurants, but Triangle Restaurant Week aims to turn diners out each January and June.

Triangle Restaurant Week returns on Monday, June 4 and runs through Sunday June 11.

This begins the second decade for Triangle Restaurant Week, which was first conceived in 2007 and launched in 2008 with just 11 participants. This year, 92 popular spots spread throughout Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill and all points in-between are in the game.

All week, participating restaurants are offering set lunch and dinner menus ranging from $10 to $35, often with options for multiple courses.

With a dining scene as robust as any you'll find any you'll find in the country, notable spots open up every month, and Restaurant Week is a good way to try something new. This year, additions include Osteria G in Apex and the new bu.ku in Wake Forest.

It also makes for a good time to try out or revisit stalwarts like the 42nd Street Oyster Bar in Raleigh or Kipos Greek Taverna in Chapel Hill.

Making reservations is key, but plenty of hot spots still have prime time tables, including typically packed Mateo in Durham and Garland in Raleigh.

Restaurants list their menus at trirestaurantweek.com, where diners can search for meals by city: Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Chapel Hill, Apex, Pittsboro and Morrisville, as well as by price point.

Triangle Restaurant Week presents: The Trifecta: A journey towards culinary excellence in the Triangle

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