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Fiesta del Pueblo, Raleigh’s biggest Latino festival, is this Sunday

La Fiesta del Pueblo rocks Raleigh

The La Fiesta del Pueblo festival, which celebrates Hispanic culture, drew thousands to downtown Raleigh in 2015. It featured traditional and modern music and dancers on the main stage and dozens of vendors lined Fayetteville St.
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The La Fiesta del Pueblo festival, which celebrates Hispanic culture, drew thousands to downtown Raleigh in 2015. It featured traditional and modern music and dancers on the main stage and dozens of vendors lined Fayetteville St.

On Sunday, Raleigh’s biggest annual Latino festival, La Fiesta del Pueblo, will mark 25 years of celebrating Latin America’s diverse food, music, art and dance.

In the heart of downtown Raleigh, La Fiesta del Pueblo will span five blocks on Fayetteville Street, between City Plaza and Morgan Street, from noon to 6 p.m.

Plena Libre, a musical group from Puerto Rico, is the festival’s headliner. They’re performing a year after Hurricane Maria devastated much of the infrastructure in Puerto Rico and left many without power for months.

“We’re very thankful that El Pueblo invited us to support this work with the Latino community,” said Gary Nuñez, music director and founder of Plena Libre, in an interview.

“We are in solidarity with that work, to build a better life for the Latino community, which of course includes Puerto Ricans.”

El Pueblo is a Raleigh nonprofit the advocates for the Latino community.

Plena Libre, a four-time Grammy-nominated orchestra, has its origins in plena and bomba rhythms, native styles to Puerto Rico’s African roots.

Plena Libre 2018.jpg
Plena Libre Nydia Melendez

“We bring a tremendous show,” Nuñez said. “Lots of joy, lots of joy.”

The festival also will feature performances from local dance ensembles and musicians.

Food booths will feature Latin American fare provided by local businesses including MexiArepa Grill, a fusion of Venezuelan and Mexican street food; Vida Dulce, which sells fruit-based popsicles, ice cream and Mexican agua fresca; Cuban Latin Grill and Five Star Coffee Roasters.

Information from health and nonprofit organizations will also be available. Festival-goers can learn more about El Pueblo’s work at one of the organization’s information booths on Fayetteville Street.

The event presents an opportunity to learn and discuss issues within the immigrant and Latino communities, said Alma Olague, a 16-year-old activist and member of El Pueblo’s youth council, in a statement.

“While the festival is an exciting and fun time for us, it’s also an important opportunity for us to talk about issues affecting our community, such as ICE, DACA and the recovery around Hurricane Florence,” Olague said. “We want to not only inform visitors, but give them an opportunity to help create the change they wish to see.”

The festival is free, wheelchair accessible and for all ages. El Pueblo is offering sighted guides for anyone who may need assistance.

To schedule a guided tour, or to receive more information about accessibility at the festival, contact Cecilia Saloni at cecilia@elpueblo.org, or call (919) 835-1525 ext. 104.

Details

What: La Fiesta del Pueblo

Where: All five blocks of Fayetteville Street, downtown Raleigh

Cost: Free

Info: elpueblo.org/la-fiesta-del-pueblo-2018

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