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Deputy and troopers accused of beating Raleigh man turn themselves in

Kyron Dwain Hinton discusses indictments of three cops accusing them of beating and injuring him

Kyron Dwain Hinton talks with reporters after a Wake County grand jury handed up indictments Tuesday against three law enforcement officers, accusing them of beating and injuring a Raleigh man with flashlights and a police dog on April 3, 2018.
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Kyron Dwain Hinton talks with reporters after a Wake County grand jury handed up indictments Tuesday against three law enforcement officers, accusing them of beating and injuring a Raleigh man with flashlights and a police dog on April 3, 2018.

The Wake County sheriff's deputy and N.C. State Highway Patrol troopers accused of beating and injuring a man with flashlights and a police dog turned themselves in to law enforcement officers on Wednesday to be booked.

Cameron Broadwell, a Wake County sheriff's deputy and handler of the police dog involved in the April 3 incident, and troopers Michael G. Blake and Tabitha L. Davis were officially charged.

Broadwell has been charged with one felony count each of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury, assault inflicting serious bodily injury and willfully failing to discharge duties. Blake and Davis have both been charged with assault inflicting bodily injury and willfully failing to discharge duties, according to grand jury indictments made public this week.

Wake County Superior Court Judge Paul Ridgeway set bond for the three at $50,000 each. Their next court date is set for June 11, according to Wake County District Attorney Lorrin Freeman.

The accusations stem from an incident on April 3 in East Raleigh when Kyron Dwain Hinton, 29, was crossing the street on foot at North Raleigh Boulevard and Yonkers Road. Hinton has said he left a sweepstakes parlor around 10:30 that night and was headed to downtown Raleigh when police stopped him.

Homeless at the time, Hinton said police stopped him in the middle of the street after he lost all his money at Good Luck Sweepstakes.

"I was angry," he said in a recent recollection of the incident. "I didn't say I wasn't, and I was moving my arms and hands from side to side, but not with a threatening action."

Hinton said he did not make any threatening gestures or threats, but acknowledged "talking junk. I was saying, 'Why you stopped me? This is some b******t.' I didn't threaten nobody. I didn't have a gun."

Hinton said he was punched in the face and then was on the ground on his stomach when a police dog bit him on his side, arms and head.

"I didn't hit nobody," he said. I "didn't grab nobody. I really couldn't." He said that after he was handcuffed, he could feel his pants being pulled down and then the dog started sniffing him.

Deputies said Hinton had been "engaging in violent conduct" and "creating the threat of imminent fighting and violence,” and accused him of ignoring commands to get on the ground.

Additionally, Hinton was accused of striking Loki, the Wake County Sheriff's Office K9, in the face.

An arrest warrant contended that Hinton implied having a gun by pointing his hand in the air as if he held a firearm.

The Wake County Sheriff's Office charged Hinton with disorderly conduct, resisting a public officer and assault on a law enforcement animal. But Wake County prosecutors dropped the charges on May 7.

The decision by a Wake County grand jury to hand up indictments against the officers brought swift praise from Raleigh organizations advocating for an advisory board that would give citizens a part in making sure that the balance of power between law enforcement officers and the communities they serve are equal.

The N.C. Police Benevolent Association issued quick criticism.

John Midgette, executive director of the association, reiterated his discontent on Wednesday with Freeman, who rejected Broadwell's request to give his side of the story to the grand jury — a rare occurrence for defendants under North Carolina's process.

Midgette also was critical of the $50,000 bond the officers had to post to avoid incarceration while waiting for their trials.

"It was stunning to watch the District Attorney's office pursue secured bonds," Midgette said.

His association has represented Broadwell and other Wake County deputies, Raleigh police officers and at least one trooper who responded to the April 3 incident or were involved with the booking of Hinton.

As part of the State Bureau of Investigation's probe into the matter, investigators collected and watched video from body and dashboard cameras.

Freeman said on Wednesday she would leave it up to a Wake County judge to decide whether the footage should be released to the public. A hearing on the matter is set for 11 a.m. May 25.

Midgette said Wednesday he did not know whether the police association would object to a public airing of the video.

"A lot of times we do that because we don't want to prejudice the jury," Midgette said.

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