Local

'Do you even care about the Ville?': J. Cole's Fayetteville house vandalized

"J. Cole ... Do you even care about the Ville?" in black spray paint on the front of J. Cole's Forest Hills Drive home in Fayetteville.
"J. Cole ... Do you even care about the Ville?" in black spray paint on the front of J. Cole's Forest Hills Drive home in Fayetteville.

Multi-platinum, award-winning rapper J. Cole's Fayetteville house was vandalized.

Cole's third album was named "2014 Forest Hills Drive" for his Fayetteville home, a 1,600-square-foot house on Forest Hills Drive in Fayetteville.

The album cover shows Cole sitting on the roof of the house.

When Cole hosted a 2016 homecoming concert in Fayetteville, his set was designed to look like the house.

The Forest Hills Drive house has a white picket fence out front and a pink mailbox.

Cole, 30, has said multiple times that the house felt like a mansion when he moved in with his mom and brother after living in a Spring Lake trailer following his parents' divorce.

Now it's been vandalized.

"J. Cole ... Do you even care about the Ville?" the black spray paint across the front of the house read.

Over the weekend, a photo of the vandalized house surfaced on social media.

Carlos Trejos, who took a photo of the house, said he and his girlfriend were driving by on May 31 when they spotted the tagged home.

By Monday, the spray painted message was no longer visible on the house.

The Fayetteville Police Department said it had not been contacted about the vandalism.

As of Monday at about 3 p.m., Cole and his team had not responded to the vandalism or requests for comment.

Cole's mother lost the home to foreclosure, but after he rose to fame on the back of his music, Cole purchased the house.

Cole, who is intensely private and gives few interviews, told New York's Combat Jack Internet radio show he planned to turn the house into a rent-free home for single mothers and their families.

"My goal is to have that be a haven for a family," Cole said. "So every two years, a new family will come in and live rent-free. The idea is that it's a single mother with multiple kids. I want her kids to feel how I felt when we got the house."

Related stories from Raleigh News & Observer

  Comments