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Don’t destroy your Nikes, NC police say. They have another idea.

Man burns shoes in protest of Colin Kaepernick’s Nike ad

A man burns his Nike shoes after the company hired Colin Kaepernick to be the face of its newest "Just Do It" ad campaign.
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A man burns his Nike shoes after the company hired Colin Kaepernick to be the face of its newest "Just Do It" ad campaign.

Does Colin Kaepernick’s new Nike ad make you want to pull out those pricey Nike sneakers and cut them to bits?

Burn them?

Commit other acts of destruction on anything featuring that iconic swoosh?

Just don’t do it.

Donate, don’t destroy, one North Carolina police department said on Sept. 4.

Nike on Monday unveiled Colin Kaepernick as the face of its newest ad, released for the 30th anniversary of the company's "Just Do It" slogan.

Hillsborough police are asking people to eschew a “national trend of destroying perfectly good Nike shoes,” according to the department’s Facebook page.

“If your plan is to destroy them, contact the Hillsborough Police Department and we will get them to someone who could use them,” the department wrote. “This is not a political post, just a sensible one.”

The police department used the hashtag “#donatebeforedestruction” to promote its efforts.

To donate your shoes, call Hillsborough police at 919-296-9500.

Nike’s ad features a close-up photo of former NFL quarterback Kaepernick with text that reads, “Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoIt.”

Kaepernick, who began a movement among athletes of kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police brutality against unarmed black people, has been off the field for more than a year.

He recently renewed a “multiyear deal with Nike that makes him a face of the 30th anniversary of the sports apparel company’s ‘Just Do It” campaign,’” Nike told The New York Times on Monday.

From the Black Power Salute during the 1968 Olympics to Colin Kaepernick taking a knee, here's a look at some notable anthem protests in American sports.

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