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Raleigh could get hit with the ‘dirty side’ of Florence. Here’s what that means

European hurricane model shows Florence lingering impacting the Carolinas then lingering in the area

The ECMWF model shows Hurricane Florence lingering near the Carolinas and Georgia for several days.
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The ECMWF model shows Hurricane Florence lingering near the Carolinas and Georgia for several days.

The projected path for Hurricane Florence shifted south toward South Carolina, according to a Wednesday morning updated from the National Weather Service, means the Triangle could avoid a direct hit as the Category 4 storm moves inland.

However, the shift could place much of North Carolina on the storm’s right side — or “dirty side.”

“In general, the strongest winds in a hurricane are found on the right side of the storm because the motion of the hurricane also contributes to its swirling winds,” according to NOAA.

If the storm is moving west, as Florence is projected to do after making landfall near Wilmington, N.C., the right side of the storm would be to the north of the storm, NOAA said. If the storm moves north, then the right side of the storm would be to the east.

Governor Roy Cooper tells North Carolinians to making final preparations for Hurricane Florence during a press briefing Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 12, 2018.

The difference between being on the right side or left side could be as much as 20 mph if the storm is moving at 10 mph, according to NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division.

Watch the ABC11 weather forecast for the latest on the development of Hurricane Florence and its projected track into North Carolina.

“Strong winds could also spread inland into portions of the Carolinas,” the National Weather Service warned in a tweet Wednesday morning.

High winds can take down trees and power lines. The National Weather Service recommends bringing in any unsecured objects from patios and balconies and securing other objects such as lawn furniture or garbage cans that could cause damage if hit by high wings.

Evacuations for Hurricane Florence are underway in South Carolina as some highway lanes are reversed to increase the flow of traffic away from Charleston and the SC coast.

Brian Murphy: 202.383.6089; Twitter: @MurphinDC
Follow more of our reporting on Hurricane Florence

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