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Wake sheriff fires deputy after guilty plea and will revise police dog policy

Wake sheriff fires deputy after guilty plea and will revise police dog policy

Sheriff Gerald Baker has fired Wake County deputy Cameron Broadwell after he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges in the Kyron Hinton K-9 dog attack in Raleigh in 2018. The sheriff also said he will revise the county’s K-9 policy soon.
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Sheriff Gerald Baker has fired Wake County deputy Cameron Broadwell after he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges in the Kyron Hinton K-9 dog attack in Raleigh in 2018. The sheriff also said he will revise the county’s K-9 policy soon.

Wake County Sheriff Gerald Baker has fired the K-9 deputy who pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges Monday in the Kyron Hinton dog bite case.

Baker said some people wanted Deputy Cameron Broadwell terminated immediately after the April 2018 altercation with Hinton on Raleigh Boulevard, in which the unarmed Raleigh man suffered multiple bites and a broken orbital bone. But Baker said he wanted to let the case take its legal course first.

A Raleigh Police dashcam video shows Wake County sheriff's deputy Cameron Broadwell and his dog attacking Kyron Dwain Hinton, who was already surrounded by other officers. (No Audio)

“It’s a sad day for the office and the citizens of our county,” said Baker, who was elected in November. “We lost a good officer.”

Broadwell, a deputy since 2008, pleaded guilty to willfully failing to discharge his duty in the Hinton case. As part of his plea agreement, he must surrender his law enforcement certificate. The district attorney’s office dropped felony assault charges against Broadwell, whose trial began Wednesday.

Wake County Sheriff’s Deputy Cameron Broadwell pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges in the case of releasing a K-9 dog on an unarmed man last year. Broadwell will permanently surrender his law enforcement certification.

District Attorney Lorrin Freeman said she would recommend that Baker’s office revise its K-9 policy so that dogs are only used to apprehend violent offenders. The sheriff said Monday that changes will be made soon.

“We’ll continue to use it,” he said. “We just want to use it the right way.”

Wake County has nine K-9 officers on staff. As written, its 2015 K-9 policy says the handler will give a verbal warning before releasing a dog, including the fact that it may bite suspects who do not surrender.

Broadwell told Hinton three times, “Get on the ground or you’re gonna get bit!”

Executive director of Justice Served NC, Diana Powell, speaks about the case against Cameron Broadwell, the Wake County Sheriff's deputy who pleaded guilty Monday to misdemeanor charges for releasing a K-9 unit dog on Kyron Hinton last year.

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Josh Shaffer covers Wake County and federal courts. He has been a reporter for The News & Observer since 2004 and previously wrote a column about unusual people and places.
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