Local

Shark attack sends 8-year-old boy to hospital, NC officials say

Shark attack sends 8-year-old boy to hospital in NC

An 8-year-old boy was taken to a North Carolina hospital Sunday after he was attacked by a shark, Bald Head Island officials said.
Up Next
An 8-year-old boy was taken to a North Carolina hospital Sunday after he was attacked by a shark, Bald Head Island officials said.

An 8-year-old boy was taken to a North Carolina hospital Sunday after he was attacked by a shark, Bald Head Island officials said.

Paramedics responded to a call about a shark bite at about 4 p.m., WECT reported.

The boy was in the ocean when the shark grabbed him by the leg, causing multiple puncture wounds, according to Spectrum News.

The Bald Head Island ferry took the boy to an area hospital, where he’s expected to make a full recovery, WTVD reports.

Village Manager Chris McCall told WTVD, “A young boy was bitten by something (assumed) to be a shark given the type of wounds sustained and assessment made by first responders,” McCall said.

This is the third reported shark attack along the North Carolina shore this year.

The chances of getting bit by a shark while swimming in the ocean are very, very slim. Just in case, and to hopefully ease your mind, here are a few tips from the International Shark Attack File to reduce your chances of getting bit.

On June 10, a 19-year-old was injured by what town officials called a “marine” animal bite on his foot off the beach in Ocean Isle, McClatchy reported. His father said surgery closed about 10 inches of wounds, and “a full recovery” is expected.

Seventeen-year-old Paige Winter lost most of her leg after a shark attack at Fort Macon State Park on June 2.

According to a University of Florida study in 2017, there was an average of two to three shark attacks per year for the previous 14 years in North Carolina, which has not had a fatal attack since 2001, The News & Observer reported.

In 2018, there were three reported cases of unprovoked shark attacks in North Carolina, the same number as in South Carolina, the University of Florida study showed.

The risk of being killed in a shark attack is 1 in 3.7 million, according to the study, meaning there are better chances of dying of the flu, drowning, lightning strikes or train crashes among other possibilities.

Bald Head Island, where the latest attack occurred, is a 20-minute ferry ride from Southport, and it’s almost the southern-most tip of North Carolina. Cars are not allowed on the island and most people get around by golf carts and bicycles, according to VisitNC.com.

Paige Winter, 17 survived a shark attack off a N.C. beach Sunday, but doctors had to amputate her left leg. “Although I have extensive injuries, including an amputated leg and damage to my hands, I will be okay,” she said in a statement.

Noah Feit is a Real Time reporter with The State and McClatchy Carolinas Regional Team. The award-winning journalist has worked for multiple newspapers since starting his career in 1999.
  Comments