Under the Dome

Roy Cooper for president? 'I'm sure I'll get some calls.'

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper discusses the opioid crisis during a visit to the SouthLight Healthcare facility on Garner Road in Raleigh, N.C. on Thursday, May 18, 2017.
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper discusses the opioid crisis during a visit to the SouthLight Healthcare facility on Garner Road in Raleigh, N.C. on Thursday, May 18, 2017. rwillett@newsobserver.com

Could the Democrats' search for a candidate to take on Donald Trump lead them to North Carolina?

Gov. Roy Cooper made it sound as though he thinks he'd be a sought-after candidate — at some point, anyway — during a Politico event at Duke University on Thursday.

Cooper also offered a take or two distancing himself from the Trump administration.

When the event moderator asked Cooper which Democratic candidates should run for the presidency, Cooper replied, "Being the governor of a swing state, I’m sure I'll get some calls."

Cooper, a Democrat who spent 16 years as attorney general before successfully challenging Republican Gov. Pat McCrory in 2016, went on to say he plans to stick with his North Carolina job not just through the end of his current four-year term, but for another four-year term to follow.

Cooper is a member of Trump's commission on opioid abuse. When asked about working with Trump, he said he would fight him when he believes the president is wrong, such as on Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate change agreement.



Cooper also expressed concerns about turnover in Trump’s Cabinet, noting that his own Cabinet hasn’t had any departures.

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