North Carolina

Transgender woman charged in argument over using ladies’ restroom, NC police say

A transgender woman was arrested after an argument at a North Carolina restaurant, police say.
A transgender woman was arrested after an argument at a North Carolina restaurant, police say. Getty Images/iStockphoto

A customer at a Denny’s restaurant in North Carolina wasn’t happy when a transgender woman entered the ladies’ restroom while his wife was in there, police say.

Police in Shelby responded to a call about a disturbance at the restaurant on Sunday, when tensions escalated between the customer and the 22-year-old woman, according to a police report.

The woman ended up being arrested after police say she spit at the customer who complained and cursed at him.

According to police, the customer said “he did not feel that was right” when the woman entered the ladies’ restroom while his wife was also using it.

Officers tried to “explain the law” to the customer, “who was not satisfied, but did proceed to calm down,” according to the police report.

There is no law in North Carolina that prohibits transgender people from using certain restrooms in private businesses.

HB2, the controversial law that was repealed a year after it became law in North Carolina in 2016, applied to restrooms in publicly owned buildings.

Denny’s, which has restaurants across the United States and in other countries, says it doesn’t “tolerate discrimination” and expects its customers to treat people equally.

“Our bathrooms policies across the country allow guests to use the bathroom of their gender identity,” company spokesperson Hannah Rand wrote in an email to McClatchy.

At the Denny’s on Sunday, the woman spit toward the complaining customer and his family, according to police. She was charged with disorderly conduct and released on a $2,500 cash bond, according to the arrest report.

Shelby is a town of about 20,000 people roughly 45 miles west of Charlotte.

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