North Carolina

Tropical depression breaks up. Here’s the forecast for eastern North Carolina

Tropical depression forms in the Atlantic

Check out the ABC11 forecast for the latest on a tropical depression forming in the Atlantic and its possible impact on the Carolinas later in the week.
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Check out the ABC11 forecast for the latest on a tropical depression forming in the Atlantic and its possible impact on the Carolinas later in the week.

A tropical depression fell apart as it headed toward the Carolinas thanks to a cold front coming from the west. But that front could still bring flooding and severe storms to parts of North Carolina, according to the National Weather Service.

Only remnants of the tropical depression remained as the cold front pushed rain toward the coast.

The entire North Carolina coast is under a small craft advisory Tuesday as high winds and seas up to six feet could make conditions dangerous for boaters.

As of noon, parts of eastern North Carolina were under a flood watch, including areas from Kinston to Greenville and up to Elizabeth City in the northeast corner of the state, according to the Weather Service.

According to the National Weather Service in Wilmington, the tropical depression “is expected to move northward and become absorbed by a cold front off the Carolina Coast by Wednesday. Significant impacts from the depression are not expected, although it will enhance the rip current risk. The same cold front will bring strong to possibly severe thunderstorms to the area later this afternoon and this evening.”

Much of eastern North Carolina has a threat for severe thunderstorms as the cold front moves its way across the state Tuesday and into Wednesday. Forecasters warn some areas could see one to two inches of rain from the system.

As of Tuesday morning the storm is off Florida with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph and the system is moving north at about 12 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The National Weather Service recommends to have these things handy during a hurricane.

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Charles Duncan covers what’s happening right now across North and South Carolina, from breaking news to fun or interesting stories from across the region. He holds degrees from N.C. State University and Duke and lives two blocks from the ocean in Myrtle Beach.
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