Weather News

Hurricane Dorian: Where can you and your pets find shelter in North Carolina?

Former Sears location offers shelter to Hurricane Dorian evacuees

Several organizations and volunteers, with the U.S. Army National Guard, finished preparing an empty Sears location at Northgate Mall in Durham, NC, for Hurricane Dorian evacuees on Tuesday, Sep. 4.
Up Next
Several organizations and volunteers, with the U.S. Army National Guard, finished preparing an empty Sears location at Northgate Mall in Durham, NC, for Hurricane Dorian evacuees on Tuesday, Sep. 4.

At 3:20 p.m. Wednesday, 12 people, two cats, a puppy and a guinea pig had taken up shelter in and near a former Sears in Northgate Mall in Durham.

The shelter in the fading mall off Interstate 85 is one of many opening up across the state to provide a refuge from Hurricane Dorian.

As people walk into the Northgate storefront, they see rows and rows of more than 700 green cots topped with white blankets folded and wrapped in plastic.

It was a similar scene in Clayton when Gov. Roy Cooper stopped by C3 Church. Part of the mega church had been converted into a state medical support shelter to serve people who aren’t sick enough to be in the hospital, but whose needs can’t be met at a regular shelter.

There, the cots were black and topped with care packages that included sheets, robes, bed pans and toiletries.

“There is already one patient here,” Cooper said around 1:30 p.m .Wednesday. “We expect more evacuees to come our way and the storm gets closer.”

Teams of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and others, along with donated medical equipment and supplies, came from area hospitals.

“It’s amazing how fast they can come up here and set up,” Cooper said.

Watch the ABC11 Friday morning forecast for Hurricane Dorian as it moves north to the Carolinas.

The Clayton shelter, however, isn’t one that people can just drive up to, said Chuck Lewis, an assistant chief with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

People having an emergency should call 911 or report to their local emergency officials, Lewis said.

People who need to evacuate with a person who is medically fragile should reach out to their county emergency operations center, which will help them find the best place to stay, he said.

The shelter at the former Sears in Durham was opened under a partnership between the state, the American Red Cross and other agencies,

A companion animal support trailer, which can house up to 43 pets, has been set up outside. Mobile showers and bathrooms have been set up in trailers and a container in the parking lot.

Tom Hegele, a spokesperson for the shelter,said firefighters, community emergency response teams, volunteers and others helped transform the former Sears..

“Have you ever watched a circus come to town and how they go from an empty lot to a big top?” he said. “It’s about what this reminded me of.”

Things to bring to a shelter:

Emergency kit.

Bedding

Clothing for a few days

Daily medications and medical devices

Chargers for phone and medical divices

Items for infants and pets.

*Source: ReadyNC

Emergency shelters

Brunswick County

North Brunswick High School, 114 Scorpion Drive, Leland — Pet friendly

South Brunswick High School, 280 Cougar Road, Boiling Spring Lakes — Pet friendly

West Brunswick High School, 550 Whiteville Road, Shallotte — Pet friendly

Columbus County

East Columbus High School, 32 Gator Lane, Lake Waccamaw — Not pet friendly

Edgewood Elementary, 317 E Calhoun St., Whiteville — Pet friendly

Guidewood Elementary, 11570 Swamp Fox Hwy East, Tabor City — Not pet friendly

South Columbus High School, 40 Stallion Drive, Tabor City — Not Pet Friendly

West Columbus High School, 7294 Andrew Jackson Highway SW, Cerro Gordo —Not pet friendly

Durham County

Sears - Northgate Mall (SCRS), 1620 Guess Road, Durham — Pet friendly

Johnston County

North Johnston Middle School (Opens Thursday at 1 p.m.), 435 Oil Company Road, Micro, — Pet friendly

Related stories from Raleigh News & Observer

Virginia Bridges covers criminal justice in Orange and Durham counties for The Herald-Sun and The News & Observer. She has worked for newspapers for more than 15 years. In 2017, the N.C. Press Association awarded her first place for beat feature reporting. The N.C. State Bar Association awarded her the 2018 Media & Law Award for Best Series.
  Comments