Opinion

2/7 Letters: Moving DMV will serve taxpayers

N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles employee Tamara Freeman voices her concerns over a proposal to move the DMV headquarters from Raleigh to Rocky Mount during a forum Monday, Feb. 4, 2019 at the State Employees Association of North Carolina central office in Raleigh.
N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles employee Tamara Freeman voices her concerns over a proposal to move the DMV headquarters from Raleigh to Rocky Mount during a forum Monday, Feb. 4, 2019 at the State Employees Association of North Carolina central office in Raleigh. tlong@newsobserver.com

DMV move beneficial

In response to “DMV move” (Feb. 5 Letters to the Editor):

The major thrust of Robert Broome’s letter was the burden that relocating the DMV headquarters from Raleigh to Rocky Mount will pose for DMV employees.

But what about the savings that can be realized by the relocation – the savings to the tax-paying public?

Sure, some workers will be inconvenienced by the move, but the burden seems light, all things considered.

A one-hour commute for those who refuse to move? That’s not unduly harsh. The impacted workers can move closer to the new facility, if as Broome allows, their cars will suffer undue wear and tear. You do what you got to do.

A lot of people down east commute to the Raleigh area every day. What’s the big deal here?

Do the taxpayers work for the state government employees or is it the other way around?

Robert Peele, Rocky Mount

Jobs for Eastern NC

The recommendation to locate the new DMV headquarters in Rocky Mount best serves the interests of taxpayers and the community workforce.

A high percentage of the DMV headquarters workforce currently resides in Eastern North Carolina and commuters and taxpayers will be rewarded by the change. The commute to Rocky Mount will be far less stressful and travel times reduced significantly.

Eastern N.C. jobs will be another bonus for a region in decline.

Congrats to Rocky Mount, and hopefully the Council of State will follow the law and save taxpayer dollars and reduce congestion to Raleigh.

M. Durwood Stephenson, Clayton

Praise for Folt

We feel especially fortunate to have had Carol Folt as chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill for the last six years. Her talented, energetic and courageous leadership was appreciated at so many levels.

She has done so much for our university, including engineering an all-encompassing strategic plan, leading the most successful capital campaign to date with over half of the $4.25 billion goal already raised, and overseeing the growth of UNC’s federal biomedical research enterprise to reach fifth in the country.

Her commitment to diversity and affordability has been unparalleled.

Yet, she remained down-to-earth, taking time to interact closely with students and staff and faculty – passing out pizza slices during final exam week, graciously posing for countless student-requested selfies, and regularly cheering on UNC’s teams at numerous sports events.

Chancellor Folt’s leadership was always human, inclusive and humane, and we have all been enriched by it. She will be missed, but her courageous heart remains here at Carolina.

Leslie Parise, Chair of the Faculty

Shayna Hill, Chair of the Employee Forum

Chapel Hill



Expand Medicaid

North Carolina should make the move that 36 other states have already made and expand access to Medicaid.

Leaving people uninsured drives up health care costs for everyone.

Health insurance premiums for people who buy their own health insurance are 7 percent lower in states that have closed their coverage gap than in states that have not.

When patients cannot pay for health care costs, hospitals often eat the cost. Often, hospitals offset that loss by charging higher rates for insured patients, called “cost-shifting.” That translates into higher premiums for every individual and employer who buys health insurance.

Now is the right time to act: NC Medicaid is strong and stable, and its financial predictability will increase with the transition to managed care. We should act now to give our neighbors access to health care.

Sheila Denn, Raleigh

$11K for a CT scan

I recently had a CT scan performed at WakeMed Cary Hospital. The actual procedure takes about 15 minutes.

They’ve informed me that the procedure will be billed for almost $11,000! Yes, I realize the amount I might have to pay might be a lot less – but $11,000! We must do something about medical coverage for citizens of the United States.

Stephen Bank, Cary

Political hatchet job

Where is the reporting about the real story concerning Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s photo?

What is the source of that 35-year-old “news”? Someone had to do some serious digging. Why now? Oh! The 2020 elections are coming!

The N&O and other media are not doing their jobs if they are not investigating the source of this. It looks to me a lot like a Karl Rove-style hatchet job by “leave no trace” political operatives.

Bob Winton, Durham

Ned Barnett is the associate opinion editor for The News & Observer. He can be reached at 919-829-4512.


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