Opinion

3/26 Letters: We need more women representing us in government. Interested in running?

Women’s March on Raleigh participants cross the bridge connecting the NC legislative building to Halifax Mall on Jan. 26. More women are serving in elected office, including a record 102 in the U.S House. NC state lawmakers will urge more women to run for office during a Facebook event at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Women’s March on Raleigh participants cross the bridge connecting the NC legislative building to Halifax Mall on Jan. 26. More women are serving in elected office, including a record 102 in the U.S House. NC state lawmakers will urge more women to run for office during a Facebook event at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. jwall@newsobserver.com

When we officially became NC state legislators in January 2019, we joined the largest class of women legislators in the history of our state. This year women make up 25 percent of the North Carolina General Assembly with 10 female senators and 34 representatives. Comparatively, this makes us 32nd in the country for overall female state legislative representation. Nationally, while women are almost 51 percent of the population we make-up only 28 percent of all state legislatures. Women of color are only 6.2 percent of state legislators in the country.

As Women’s History Month comes to an end, we want to encourage women across our state to consider political leadership. Studies show women need to be asked on average seven times to run for office. So allow us: Please run. Please run. Please run. Please run. Please run. Please run. Please run.

A little curious? Join us on Wednesday afternoon, March 27, at 4:30 for a Facebook Town Hall on Rep. Ashton Wheeler Clemmons’ Facebook page. We will share a few thoughts, ways to get started and answer your questions.

Finally, please run.

N.C. Sen. Vickie Sawyer and Reps. Sydney Batch, Lisa Stone Barnes and Ashton Wheeler Clemmons

Children’s voices

On March 1, thousands of children around the world left their classrooms to share the message that we must do something to slow the steady deterioration of the environment. They know that, unless we rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, their generation will grow up with the catastrophic consequences of a severely disrupted climate.

While each of us must find ways to reduce our own carbon emissions, making rapid progress toward a solution depends on the policies of our government and the actions of corporations. A bipartisan bill to address carbon emissions has been introduced in the House of Representatives called the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R.763). This policy puts a fee on carbon in fossil fuels coming into the country. The fee starts low but increases over time, providing incentive for everyone to move toward cleaner energy options. The collected fees are allocated in equal shares to the American people to spend as they see fit. The government does not keep any of the money from the carbon fee. The voices of our children are speaking clearly. Are we listening?

Arland Eyl

Durham

Self-funded

Now that the Mueller investigation is over, and the Democrats still won’t accept the findings. I suggest if they want to continue their investigations, they pay for it out of their own personal bank accounts and not with tax dollars. Two years and $26 million is enough! The witch hunt is over. Go back to what you were elected to do, run the country.

Buddy Holeman

Wake Forest

Less redaction, please

The Mueller report is complete, and it is of paramount importance for our democracy that it be released in full, with as little redaction as is needed to protect our intelligence gathering operations. The American people need to know to what extent Russia undermined our democracy and whether or not the president and others have worked in tandem with Russian President Vladimir Putin’s anti-democratic attack on our government. The voting public deserves to know, and given the Justice Department’s reluctance to indict a sitting president, congressional oversight is the only way that the president can be held to account for his actions. Whatever the report reveals, we deserve transparency, democracy, and justice.

Brian McPhee

Chapel Hill

Ad insanity

Regarding the opinion piece “Ad Insanity is Eclipsing March Madness” (March 22) by Coach John LeBar and Allen Paul, I feel they speak for the masses who are sick and tired of the ever-encroaching ad blitz on March Madness. The Coca-Cola split screens are mind-numbingly annoying. Could we just watch a kid take his shot?

Mahlon Palmer

Greenville

Mascot practice

It’s a very rare thing for me to break out laughing, multiple times, with sheer pleasure rather than irony, while reading the front page of the N&O. Brooke Cain’s “NCAA bracket by mascot” (March 20) did the trick.

Sherry L Graham

Raleigh

One more study

Before moving the state Department of Motor Vehicles headquarters from New Bern Avenue to Rocky Mount, may I suggest a review of the data that make the current buildings obsolete. The causes given for destroying what appears to be a very good building are fire safety and environmental concerns. My suggestion is “let’s have another look.” Just to be sure that the buildings cannot be restored to good health, maybe a new study with possible new technology could effectively change the need and outcome. Worth a try? I think so. I worked fifteen years in the main building and was always physically comfortable.

Charles R. Richardson

Raleigh

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