Opinion

A false narrative links the GOP and racism

Why do Democrats relentlessly accuse President Trump of being a racist?

For the same reason dogs bark, ducks quack and little boys cry wolf – it’s what they do.

Before Trump, Democrats leveled the same despicable smear against Mitt Romney – Vice President Joe Biden warned African-Americans that Romney “would put y’all back in chains!”

They launched similar attacks against John McCain, whom Rep. John Lewis compared to George Wallace, and the Bushes. Back in 2000 the NAACP ran an ad blaming George the younger for the murder of James Byrd, an African-American chained to a truck and dragged to his death by white supremacists.

And so it goes with most every Republican back to Richard Nixon.

Of course, Democrats haven’t always leveled their scurrilous attacks against Republicans. For much of their history the party used the exact same dehumanizing tactics against blacks. They frightened voters — through false claims and vile images — into supporting them by creating a bogeyman.

The endless cartoons their media henchmen are now running depicting Donald Trump as a Klansman are just modern versions of the caricatures that portrayed African-Americans as violent rapists. The Democrat deck has always included 52 race cards.

Democrats labor to disavow that history, pretending they instantly shed their racist past in the 1960s. The story is they knowingly surrendered their hold on the South to advance the cause of civil rights.

That’s humbug.

In fact, Democrats continued to control most southern states — which they now describe as hotbeds of white supremacy — for decades. North Carolina, for example, didn’t elect a legislature under full Republican control until 2010.

Note that Biden recently got in hot water because he described his alliance with Democrat segregationists during the 1970s

Yes, the South has become far more Republican in recent decades. But what that false Democrat narrative ignores is that the region increasingly turned towards the GOP as it moved away from its racist past.

It wasn’t Republican racism, but the Democrats’ embrace of high taxes and regulation that drove voters into the arms of the GOP.

Now, Trump. Yes he uses insensitive language. But a fair-minded person, while hoping that the president would be more precise, should see that he is not a racist. Racism is the broad rejection of groups; he criticizes specific individuals and organizations with which he has a particular beef.

He does not scorn black athletes – just players who refuse to stand for the national anthem.

He did not attack all women of color – just four members of Congress, the so-called Squad, who have insulted him and the United States.

He has explicitly and repeatedly condemned white supremacists, neo-Nazis and other haters, including in his grossly mischaracterized remarks following the 2017 violence in Charlottesville.

None of this context matters to those bent on destroying this president.

While we all might want Trump to choose his words more carefully, what about his critics who accuse him on a daily basis of being a white supremacist and a Nazi, a mentally unhinged kleptocrat with incestuous desires — all in a naked effort to overturn his election?



Contributing columnist J. Peder Zane can be reached at jpederzane@jpederzane.com.







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