Editorials

No rush on judiciary – at all

Speaker of the N.C. House Tim Moore's gavel is seen as the N.C. General Assembly convenes at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, NC, on Jan. 25, 2017.
Speaker of the N.C. House Tim Moore's gavel is seen as the N.C. General Assembly convenes at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, NC, on Jan. 25, 2017. cseward@newsobserver.com

Beware Republicans in a rush. There is not any reason to change judicial districts in North Carolina, as pushed by state House Republicans, except to draw some district lines more favorable to Republicans. But that’s what GOP leaders want to do, despite the unholy mess, and long legal fight, they created with gerrymandered legislative districts.

In a special session slated next week, judiciary reforms are on the agenda, but while House members want to consider judicial districts giving them an advantage, some Republicans in the Senate want to look at the appointment, rather than the election, of some judges.

If the citizens are lucky, the differing agendas will cause a stalemate and this session will result in little more than lawmakers kicking back in Raleigh for a few days and wasting a few hundred thousand of the public’s dollars. Unfortunately, however, special sessions have a way or morphing into whatever leaders want them to be.

What’s behind the rush? More than likely, there’s some fear on the part of GOP leaders that the strong possibility of a Democratic surge in Congress next year thanks to the disastrous performance of President Trump will have an effect in North Carolina, where the GOP may lose its veto-proof majority in the Legislature. If that happens, a lot of goofy ideas are going to be stopped by Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto.

There’s no rush on gerrymandering judicial districts and making the judicial branch of government as partisan as the Nightmare on Jones Street.

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