Editorials

A green world

Artemis, the legendary Grecian patron saint of childbirth was thought to conduct spring sessions regarding motherhood and child raising, held at her own sacred grove snuggled in the woods beside the shores of Italy’s Lake Nemi. As in many of such tales of old, this was an attempt by our early ancestors to understand those fates that determine life, luck and living.

Even the earliest of mankind quickly recognized these welcome and pleasure-filled mid-spring days as nature’s flowering season, and quickly associated the burden of wind, sun and rain with the related timeliness of the blossoming of lilies and violets, the awakening of sun-loving flowers, of fruit and seed transforming, tales building as mankind became more aware of the grand festival of romance, and the reveling that comes with lengthening days of the warming sun

It is more, much more, it is the season when our world shifts from the long shadows and wintery dark masses of stout and spreading live oaks, dark and shadowy evergreens and the towering firs and pine, those whose leaves and shadowy needles have stood firm and dark against the lingering winter skies, now fast giving way to a new awakening canopy spreading green magic.

Chlorophyll is that magic foundation of life. It’s the green of living plants that enables them to absorb energy from light, nature’s original solar system, powering the foundations of root and flower, food, fiber and sheltering of life. It feeds the algae in the seas, forms the prairie grasses and cypress swamp bottoms. Beyond feeding the fishes of the sea, its potency creates the energy man derives from oil wells and coal mines.

Without the help of Artemis, and her efforts in the birthing of the green, this world as we know it, would be merely another barren, lifeless rock spinning through space.

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